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  • gretchenrubin 20:02:00 on 2017/09/05 Permalink
    Tags: character, , ,   

    Are You a Fan of Myers-Briggs, StrengthsFinder, the “Big Five,” Enneagram, the Five Love Languages, or Other Personality Frameworks? 

    Do you love a great personality framework? I sure do.

    I believe they can be a great tool for self-knowledge — they help to shine a spotlight on hidden patterns of behavior and thinking.

    If, like me, you’re fascinated by these kinds of frameworks, I think you’ll be intrigued by my Four Tendencies model — it  divides the world into Upholders, Questioners, Obligers, and Rebels. (Learn more and take the Quiz here.)

    People often ask me how my Four Tendencies framework corresponds to other frameworks — for instance, how it matches up with Myers-Briggs or the Big Five. I’ve even had several people suggest that the Four Tendencies correspond to the Four Houses of Hogwarts. (By the way, they don’t!)

    In my view, each framework has its own nuances and strengths, which are lost if we try to map one framework onto another. So I don’t try to say that “this” equals “that.”

    At the same time, it’s true that the Four Tendencies can be used alongside other frameworks, to provide deeper insights.

    For instance, perhaps you’ve found the StrengthsFinder model to be very illuminating. Thinking about your “strengths” alongside your “Tendency” can give you deeper insight into yourself.

    Or perhaps you’re reflecting on the results of the quiz you took to learn your score on the “Big Five.” Thinking about those results, in context of the Four Tendencies, can help you better to understand those findings.

    I have to say, one thing I like about my Four Tendencies framework is that it’s narrow. I think that some frameworks try to be too universal in their descriptions; they try to draw a picture of people’s entire personalities, and in my observation, people are too complicated for that exercise to work well.

    The Four Tendencies model explains just one narrow aspect of your personality. If we lined up fifty Obligers, they would look very different from each other — depending on how ambitious, considerate, intellectual, adventurous, aggressive, neurotic, introverted or extroverted, etc. they were — but as to how they respond to outer and inner expectations, they’d all respond the same way.

    Your “response to expectations” is a narrow aspect of your nature, true, but it turns out to be hugely significant in how the rest of your personality plays out in the world.

    At the same time, when using these frameworks, it’s important not to let these categories to become stifling; they’re not meant to box us in or limit our sense of possibility, but to point the way to helpful understanding or change.

    My own favorite personality framework is (no surprise) the one I created, but I love reading and thinking about all of them. If you’d like to learn more about other personality frameworks, I list some of my favorite books in the post, “Do You Love Personality Frameworks? These 10 Books Will Help You Understand Yourself.

    Some of the most popular include:

    1. The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment  by Gary Chapman. Argues that people speak different “love languages”: Words of Affirmation, Quality Time, Receiving Gifts, Acts of Service, and Physical Touch.

    2. Personality: What Makes You the Way You Are by Daniel Nettle. Discusses the “Big Five” personality model (extroversion, neuroticism, conscientiousness, agreeableness, openness) and includes a quiz for self-evaluation.

    3. The Wisdom of the Enneagram by Don Richard Riso and Ross Hudson. Divides people into nine categories: Reformer, Helper, Achiever, Individualist, Investigator, Loyalist, Enthusiast, Challenger, and Peacemaker.

    4. Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type by Isabella Briggs Meyers. Based on the theories of Carl Jung, argues that people fall into sixteen types, in different combinations of four pairs: Extroversion or Introversion; Sensing or Intuition; Thinking or Feeling; Judgment or Perception.

    4. Now, Discover Your Strengths by Marcus Buckingham; Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath. Discusses the thirty-four “strengths” and helps readers identify and take advantage their individual own strengths.

    5. The Four Tendencies by Gretchen Rubin. Of course, I have to add my own book to the list!

    One question that often arises is: How “scientific” is a particular framework? — what research supports it, has it been validated?

    This is a very important question, and I’m thrilled by the work that researchers have begun to provide a scientific examination of my own framework.

    At the same time, though, it seems to me that if a particular way of looking at the world illuminates something for you, that clarity has its own validity.

    Research in a lab is one way to understand human nature, but it’s not the only way.

    Has one of these frameworks been very helpful to you? What frameworks have I overlooked?

    The post Are You a Fan of Myers-Briggs, StrengthsFinder, the “Big Five,” Enneagram, the Five Love Languages, or Other Personality Frameworks? appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 19:18:55 on 2017/09/05 Permalink
    Tags: , character,   

    Are You a Fan of Myers-Briggs, StrengthsFinder, the “Big Five,” Enneagram, the Five Love Languages, or Other Personality Frameworks? 

    Do you love a great personality framework? I sure do.

    I believe they can be a great tool for self-knowledge — they help to shine a spotlight on hidden patterns of behavior and thinking.

    If, like me, you're fascinated by these kinds of frameworks, I think you’ll be intrigued by my Four Tendencies model -- it  divides the world into Upholders, Questioners, Obligers, and Rebels. (Learn more and take the Quiz here.)

    People often ask me how my Four Tendencies framework corresponds to other frameworks — for instance, how it matches up with Myers-Briggs or the Big Five. I've even had several people suggest that the Four Tendencies correspond to the Four Houses of Hogwarts. (By the way, they don't!)

    In my view, each framework has its own nuances and strengths, which are lost if we try to map one framework onto another. So I don’t try to say that "this" equals "that."

    At the same time, it's true that the Four Tendencies can be used alongside other frameworks, to provide deeper insights.

    For instance, perhaps you've found the StrengthsFinder model to be very illuminating. Thinking about your "strengths" alongside your "Tendency" can give you deeper insight into yourself.

    Or perhaps you're reflecting on the results of the quiz you took to learn your score on the "Big Five." Thinking about those results, in context of the Four Tendencies, can help you better to understand those findings.

    I have to say, one thing I like about my Four Tendencies framework is that it's narrow. I think that some frameworks try to be too universal in their descriptions; they try to draw a picture of people's entire personalities, and in my observation, people are too complicated for that exercise to work well.

    The Four Tendencies model explains just one narrow aspect of your personality. If we lined up fifty Obligers, they would look very different from each other -- depending on how ambitious, considerate, intellectual, adventurous, aggressive, neurotic, introverted or extroverted, etc. they were -- but as to how they respond to outer and inner expectations, they'd all respond the same way.

    Your "response to expectations" is a narrow aspect of your nature, true, but it turns out to be hugely significant in how the rest of your personality plays out in the world.

    At the same time, when using these frameworks, it’s important not to let these categories to become stifling; they’re not meant to box us in or limit our sense of possibility, but to point the way to helpful understanding or change.

    My own favorite personality framework is (no surprise) the one I created, but I love reading and thinking about all of them. If you'd like to learn more about other personality frameworks, I list some of my favorite books in the post, "Do You Love Personality Frameworks? These 10 Books Will Help You Understand Yourself."

    Some of the most popular include:

    1. The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment  by Gary Chapman. Argues that people speak different “love languages”: Words of Affirmation, Quality Time, Receiving Gifts, Acts of Service, and Physical Touch.

    2. Personality: What Makes You the Way You Are by Daniel Nettle. Discusses the "Big Five" personality model (extroversion, neuroticism, conscientiousness, agreeableness, openness) and includes a quiz for self-evaluation.

    3. The Wisdom of the Enneagram by Don Richard Riso and Ross Hudson. Divides people into nine categories: Reformer, Helper, Achiever, Individualist, Investigator, Loyalist, Enthusiast, Challenger, and Peacemaker.

    4. Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type by Isabella Briggs Meyers. Based on the theories of Carl Jung, argues that people fall into sixteen types, in different combinations of four pairs: Extroversion or Introversion; Sensing or Intuition; Thinking or Feeling; Judgment or Perception.

    4. Now, Discover Your Strengths by Marcus Buckingham; Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath. Discusses the thirty-four “strengths” and helps readers identify and take advantage their individual own strengths.

    5. The Four Tendencies by Gretchen Rubin. Of course, I have to add my own book to the list!

    One question that often arises is: How "scientific" is a particular framework? -- what research supports it, has it been validated?

    This is a very important question, and I'm thrilled by the work that researchers have begun to provide a scientific examination of my own framework.

    At the same time, though, it seems to me that if a particular way of looking at the world illuminates something for you, that clarity has its own validity.

    Research in a lab is one way to understand human nature, but it's not the only way.

    Has one of these frameworks been very helpful to you? What frameworks have I overlooked?

     
  • feedwordpress 19:53:37 on 2017/09/02 Permalink
    Tags: , character, ,   

    Fill in the Blank: “The Clearest Indication of Character Is ______.” 

    “The clearest indication of character is what people find laughable.”  --Goethe

    Agree, disagree?

    What do you find laughable? Have you seen people laugh in situations where you thought it reflected poorly on their characters?

     
  • gretchenrubin 12:43:13 on 2017/09/02 Permalink
    Tags: character, , ,   

    Fill in the Blank: “The Clearest Indication of Character Is ______.” 

    “The clearest indication of character is what people find laughable.”  –Goethe

    Agree, disagree?

    What do you find laughable? Have you seen people laugh in situations where you thought it reflected poorly on their characters?

    The post Fill in the Blank: “The Clearest Indication of Character Is ______.” appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • gretchenrubin 16:10:37 on 2017/04/19 Permalink
    Tags: birthday, , character, , , , , , , , , , , , ,   

    Podcast 113: Reclaim Your Dump Zones, a Hack for Making Tough Decisions, and Is Your Birthday Important to You? 

    Update: There’s an official launch date of May 18 for Elizabeth’s great new podcast with her writing partner and old friend Sarah Fain. Yes, Happier in Hollywood launches in a few weeks. I’m counting down the days!

    The Better app, all about the Four Tendencies, is now free. If you want to learn more about Upholders, Questioners, Obligers, or Rebels, join the discussion on the app. Or if you want to use the framework at work, with your health clients, with your family, with your students, you can find a lot of focused discussions there, too. And you can start or join an Accountability Group. (Don’t know your Tendency? Take the Four Tendencies quiz.)

    Try This at Home: Reclaim your dump zones. I reclaimed the little table I describe — above, you can see it pictured in its naked glory.

    Here’s one of my all-time favorite podcast episode — #10, live from Elizabeth’s messy closet.

    If you’re intrigued by the subject of clutter-busting, you might enjoy my book Happier at Home. For many people, outer order is a very important for happiness at home.

    Happiness Hack: Turn on the subtitles when you’re watching TV.

    Know Yourself Better: Is your birthday important to you — or not?

    Listener Question: Danielle asks, “My family constantly debates whether we should stay in New York City, or move to the suburbs, and it makes me feel constantly unsettled.”

    The book I mention is Daniel Gilbert’s Stumbling on Happiness.

    Demerit: I made the mistake of “treating a gift like a burden,” when I was working over spring break to get The Four Tendencies ready for publication.

    Gold Star: Jack’s nanny Cynthia made lots of special plans to make spring break fun for him.

    New feature: Each week, at the end of the podcast, I list “Two Resources for You.”

    1. To get every new episode of the podcast by email, sign up at happiercast.com/join.
    2. Every Tuesday at 3:00 pm Eastern Time, I do a Facebook Live video about the most recent episode. Join the conversation with your questions, comment, and insights. If you miss the live conversation, you can always see the archived version on my Page.

    If you want easy instructions about how to rate or review the podcast, look here. Remember, it really helps us if you do rate or review the podcast — it helps other listeners discover us.

    As mentioned above, I do weekly live videos on my Facebook Page to continue the conversation from the podcast — usually on Tuesdays at 3:00 pm ET. To join the conversation, check the schedule.

    As always, thanks to our terrific sponsors

    Check out Smith and Noble, the solution for beautiful window treatments. Go to smithandnoble.com/happier for 20% off window treatments and free in-home or on-phone design consultations and free professional measuring.

    Also check out StitchFix, an online personal styling service with real stylists who handpick clothing for you — your taste, your schedule, your lifestyle, your budget. Sign up at StitchFix.com.

    Also check out Stamps.com. Want to avoid trips to the post office, and buy and print official U.S. postage for any letter or package, right from your own computer and printer? Visit Stamps.com to sign up for a 4-week trial,  including postage and a digital scale — just enter the promo code HAPPIER.

    1pix

    We love hearing from listeners:

     

    To sign up for my free monthly newsletter, text me at 66866 and enter the word (surprise) “happier.“ Or click here.

    If you enjoyed the podcast, please tell your friends and give us a rating or review. Click here to tell your friends on Twitter.

    Listeners really respect the views of other listeners, so your response helps people find good material. (Not sure how to review? Instructions here; scroll to the bottom.)

    How to Subscribe

    If you’re like me (until recently) you’re intrigued by podcasts, but you don’t know how to listen or subscribe. It’s very easy, really. Really.  To listen to more than one episode, and to have it all in a handier way, on your phone or tablet, it’s better to subscribe. Really, it’s easy.

    Want to know what to expect from other episodes of the podcast, when you listen to the award-winning Happier with Gretchen Rubin?” We talk about how to build happier habits into everyday life, as we draw from cutting-edge science, ancient wisdom, lessons from pop culture—and our own experiences (and mistakes).  We’re sisters, so we don’t let each other get away with much!

    Want a new podcast to listen to, with the same vibe as Happier? The Onward Project is the family of podcasts that I’ve launched, for podcasts that are about “your life–made better.” The first shows are Side Hustle School and Radical Candor. Elizabeth’s show with her writing partner, Sarah Fain, will be Happier in Hollywood, so stay tuned for that.

    HAPPIER listening!

    The post Podcast 113: Reclaim Your Dump Zones, a Hack for Making Tough Decisions, and Is Your Birthday Important to You? appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • gretchenrubin 18:20:05 on 2017/04/14 Permalink
    Tags: character, , , , , Taylor Swift, , , upholder,   

    Fun with the Four Tendencies: Is Taylor Swift an Upholder? 

    I spend a lot of time thinking about my personality framework, the Four Tendencies. It’s an endlessly fascinating thing to study.

    If you don’t know if you’re an Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, or Rebel — and why it matters — you can take the quick quiz here. (More than 640,000 people have taken the quiz.)

    I’m always on the watch for Tendencies in the world. Now, we generally can’t judge people’s Tendency by what they do; we need to know how they think.

    But sometimes patterns of behaviors are so consistent that they do suggest a Tendency.

    My sister Elizabeth told me that she thinks that Taylor Swift is an Upholder. It’s not easy to tell, because of course a mega-star like Swift has a persona that’s carefully crafted for public consumption. However, judging from external factors, I agree, she sure looks like an Upholder.

    She seems to meet outer expectations very patiently and professionally—not only those related to her extensive music and business responsibilities, but also involving time-consuming, inefficient tasks like going on press tours, handling paparazzi, and putting up with all the nonsense that super-stars must endure. She meets a very high level of expectations, with no visible sign of resentment or burn-out or frustration at inefficiency.

    She has no trouble resisting the advice of her record label, and she also has no trouble following the advice of her record label. She doesn’t seem to feel pushed around by the press, social media, or her own team. In a cover profile in GQ magazine, Chuck Klosterman observed of Swift, “There is a perpetual sense that nothing about her career is accidental and that nothing about her life is unmediated. These are not unusual thoughts to have about young mainstream stars. But what’s different with Swift is her autonomy. There is no Svengali directing her career; there is no stage mother pushing her toward the spotlight. She is in total control of her own constructed reality.”

    Plus Swift exhibits an extraordinary level of self-discipline, and she’s often criticized for being “unspontaneous.” Now, what Tendency does that sound like?

     I suspect that Upholders in the entertainment business, and in the arts, sometimes go out of their way to hide their Tendency—to present themselves as more wild and more hedonistic than they actually are.

    Upholderness isn’t a very glamorous, edgy, or endearing quality. It doesn’t contribute to a fascinating biography or make good magazine copy. In her mega-hit song “Shake It Off,” Taylor Swift sings, “I stay up too late…I go on too many dates…At least that’s what people say.” Does she stay up too late? Hmmm. I wonder. 

    What do you think?

    In other news about the Four Tendencies, very soon I will be able to reveal the jacket for the book The Four Tendencies — I’m about to be able to take down that dull placeholder cover. Exciting! If you’re inclined to buy the book, it’s a big help to me if you pre-order (pre-orders help build buzz for a book among booksellers, the media, and the public). But only if you want to, of course!

    The post Fun with the Four Tendencies: Is Taylor Swift an Upholder? appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:08:55 on 2017/02/15 Permalink
    Tags: , , character, , Current Affairs, , , , , ,   

    Podcast 104: Have a “Life Story Conversation,” Ideas for Travel Beasts, and Dealing with the Emotional Toll of the News. 

    It’s time for the next installment of  Happier with Gretchen Rubin.

    We’re coming up on our second anniversary of the show! To celebrate, we want to do an episode of highlihts from the previous year. So if you have a favorite try-this-at-home, a great before-and-after story of something you tried, a favorite funny moment, let us know. Email us at podcast@gretchenrubin.com or call 77-HAPPY-336.

    Try This at Home: Have a “life story conversation.” If you want to listen to the episode of The Onward Project podcast Radical Candor where they discuss this idea, check out episode 5.

    Happiness Hack: Mary suggests, “When clothes are in bad shape, so that I can’t give them away, I pack them, and wear them one last time on the trip, and then leave them behind.” This is an especially great tip for under-buyers.

    Happiness Stumbling Block: The news. So many people have emailed and called to say, “How do I manage the emotional toll of the news?” It’s a big question.

    Elizabeth mentions Sarah’s Facebook group: #OurFirst100Days.

    Demerit: Elizabeth’s battle with the game Candy Crush continues. Have you tried unsuccessfully to delete a soul-destroying app?

    Gold Star: How I love the New York City subway system, especially the new stops on the Q line.

    If you want easy instructions about how to rate or review the podcast, look here. Remember, it really helps us if you do rate or review the podcast — it helps other listeners discover us.

    I do weekly live videos on my Facebook Page to continue the conversation from the podcast — usually on Tuesdays at 3:00 pm ET. To join the conversation, check the schedule.

    As always, thanks to our terrific sponsors

    Check out Stamps.com. Want to avoid trips to the post office, and buy and print official U.S. postage for any letter or package, right from your own computer and printer? Visit Stamps.com to sign up for a 4-week trial, plus a $110 bonus offer — just enter the promo code HAPPIER.

    Also check out StitchFix, an online personal styling service with real stylists who handpick clothing for you — your taste, your schedule, your lifestyle, your budget. Sign up at StitchFix.com.

    Also check out Smith and Noble, the solution for beautiful window treatments. Go to smithandnoble.com/happier for 20% off window treatments and free in-home or on-phone design consultations and free professional measuring.

    We love hearing from listeners:

     

    To sign up for my free monthly newsletter, text me at 66866 and enter the word (surprise) “happier.“ Or click here.

    If you enjoyed the podcast, please tell your friends and give us a rating or review. Click here to tell your friends on Twitter.

    Listeners really respect the views of other listeners, so your response helps people find good material. (Not sure how to review? Instructions here; scroll to the bottom.)

    How to Subscribe

    If you’re like me (until recently) you’re intrigued by podcasts, but you don’t know how to listen or subscribe. It’s very easy, really. Really.  To listen to more than one episode, and to have it all in a handier way, on your phone or tablet, it’s better to subscribe. Really, it’s easy.

    Want to know what to expect from other episodes of the podcast, when you listen to the award-winning Happier with Gretchen Rubin?” We talk about how to build happier habits into everyday life, as we draw from cutting-edge science, ancient wisdom, lessons from pop culture—and our own experiences (and mistakes).  We’re sisters, so we don’t let each other get away with much!

    Want a new podcast to listen to, with the same vibe as Happier? The Onward Project is the family of podcasts that I’ve launched, for podcasts that are about “your life–made better.” The first shows are Side Hustle School and Radical Candor. Elizabeth’s show with her writing partner, Sarah Fain, will be Happier in Hollywood, so stay tuned for that.

    HAPPIER listening!

    The post Podcast 104: Have a “Life Story Conversation,” Ideas for Travel Beasts, and Dealing with the Emotional Toll of the News. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 12:58:34 on 2017/02/12 Permalink
    Tags: Carl Jung, character, , purpose, , ,   

    Agree? “The Serious Problems in Life Are Never Fully Solved.” 

    “The serious problems in life, however, are never fully solved. If ever they should appear to be so it is a sure sign that something has been lost. The meaning and purpose of a problem seem to lie not in its solution but in our working at it incessantly. This alone preserves us from stultification and petrification.”

    –Carl Jung, The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche

    Agree, disagree?

    The post Agree? “The Serious Problems in Life Are Never Fully Solved.” appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:02:33 on 2017/02/06 Permalink
    Tags: , , , character, , , , , , , , Thoreau   

    A Little Happier: I Can’t Find It Outside Myself If I Can’t Find It Inside Myself. 

    I love fables, parables, paradoxes, and teaching stories of all kinds — and I also love koans.

    A “koan” is a question, story, or statement that can’t be understood logically. Zen Buddhist monks meditate on koans as a way to abandon dependence on reason in their pursuit of enlightenment.  I’ve found that thinking about a koan stimulates mindfulness. Because koans force me to challenge the usual, straightforward boxes of meaning, they push me to think about thinking.

    I’m always looking out for koans. For instance, when Pablo Picasso told an art dealer, “I often paint fakes.”

    There’s a “koan” I love so much that I used it as the epigraph to The Happiness Project (choosing the epigraphs is probably my favorite part of writing a book).

    It had great significance for my happiness project. In John Boswell’s The Life of Samuel Johnson, Boswell quotes Johnson remarking:

    “As the Spanish proverb says, ‘He who would bring home the wealth of the Indies must carry the wealth of the Indies with him, so it is with travelling, –a man must carry knowledge with him if he would bring home knowledge.’”

    Put another way, by Henry David Thoreau, in his journal entry from August 30, 1856:

    “It is in vain to dream of a wildness distant from ourselves. There is none such. It is the bog in our brains and bowels, the primitive vigor of Nature in us, that inspires that dream. I shall never find in the wilds of Labrador any greater wildness than in some recess of Concord, i.e. than I import into it.”

    I think this means: I can’t find abundance, or adventure, or knowledge, or happiness outside myself unless I can find it inside myself.

    Agree, disagree?

    Listen to this mini-podcast episode by clicking PLAY below.

    Check out Yogi Tea. When it comes to enjoying life, little moments — like drinking a delicious cup of tea — can make a big difference.

    Want to get in touch? I love hearing from listeners:

     

    Happier listening!

    The post A Little Happier: I Can’t Find It Outside Myself If I Can’t Find It Inside Myself. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:03:47 on 2017/01/03 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , character, , , Janice Lindsay, , , , , Ursula Nordstrom   

    Revealed! Three Book Club Choices for January. Happy Reading. 

    bookclubjan2017

    Because nothing boosts happiness more than a great book, each month, I suggest:

    — one outstanding book about happiness or habits

    — one outstanding work of children’s or young-adult literature–I have a crazy passion for kidlit

    — one eccentric pick–a widely admired and excellent book that I love, yes, but one that may not appeal to everyone

    Shop at IndieBound, BN.com, or Amazon (I’m an affiliate), or your favorite local bookstore. Or my favorite, visit the library!

    For all the books I choose, I love them; I’ve read most of them at least twice if not many times; and they’re widely admired.

    Bonus book this month: with Shea Olsen, my sister Elizabeth Craft has a new young-adult novel, Flower. The tag line? “She had a plan, then she met him.” Romance, temptation, secrets, and celebrity...how well I remember the phone call when Elizabeth first told about her idea for this book. And now it’s hit the shelves! Check it out.

    Now, for the three book-club choices. Drumroll…

    A book about happiness, good habits, or human nature:

    Absent in the Spring by Agatha Christie

    I don’t read many mysteries, but for some reason I felt like reading Agatha Christie’s wonderful Autobiography. In it, she discusses the writing of Absent in the Spring — an unusual book for her, because it isn’t a crime mystery (in fact, Christie wrote it under a pseudonym, Mary Westmacott). It’s about a woman who’s stuck by herself for a few days while traveling, and with that opportunity for self-reflection, she realizes the fundamental ways that she’s misunderstood herself and the people around her. It’s a short, quick, very thought-provoking book.

    Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

     

    An outstanding children’s book:

    The Secret Language by Ursula Nordstrom

    Nordstrom was an enormously brilliant, influential editor of children’s books. I’ve read Dear Genius, her terrific book of letters,  three times. She wrote this one children’s book herself, and she wasn’t satisfied by it — which is a shame, because I love it. It’s about Victoria, a young girl who goes to boarding school and makes a best friend there. How I love boarding school books,

    Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

     

    An eccentric pick:

    All About Colour by Janice Lindsay

    I’ve become obsessed with the subject of color. All about Colour is one of the most accessible, amusing, and thought-provoking discussions that I’ve read– many books about color are surprisingly dry. Lindsay has a very strong point of view (for instance, she objects to the popularity of white paint) which makes the book fun to read.

    Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

     

    If you want to make sure you never miss a month’s selections, sign up here for the book club newsletter.

    Remember, if you want to see what I read each week, I post a photo of my pile of completed books on my Facebook Page every Sunday night, #GretchenRubinReads.

    What books are you excited to read in 2017? I’m always looking for great books to add to my reading list.

    The post Revealed! Three Book Club Choices for January. Happy Reading. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
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