Tagged: #GretchenRubinReads Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • feedwordpress 10:00:17 on 2018/11/04 Permalink
    Tags: #GretchenRubinReads, , , , October,   

    What I Read This Month: October 2018 

    For more than two years now, every Monday morning, I've posted a photo on my Facebook Page of the books I finished during the week, with the tag #GretchenRubinReads

    I get a big kick out of this weekly habit—it’s a way to shine a spotlight on all the terrific books that I’ve read.

    As I write about in my book Better Than Before, for most of my life, my habit was to finish any book that I started. Finally, I realized that this approach meant that I spent time reading books that bored me, and I had less time for books that I truly enjoy. These days, I now put down a book if I don’t feel like finishing it, so I have more time to do my favorite kinds of reading.

    This habit means that if you see a book included in the #GretchenRubinReads photo, you know that I liked it well enough to read to the last page.

    If you’d like more ideas for habits to help you get more reading done, read this post or download my "Reading Better Than Before" worksheet.

    You can also follow me on Goodreads where I've recently started tracking books I’ve read.

    If you want to see what I read in September 2018, the full list is here.

    October 2018 Reading

    The Home-Maker by Dorothy Canfield Fisher -- One of my very favorite works of children's literature is the masterpiece Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher. It's on my list of my 81 Favorite Works of Children's and Young-Adult Literature. How I love that book! Through reading about Pearl Buck, I learned that Dorothy Canfield Fisher wrote for adults, so off I trotted to the library. I very much enjoyed this book—a real period piece.

    Fables for Parents by Dorothy Canfield Fisher -- These are short stories. I enjoyed them all, and two are unforgettable: "The Forgotten Mother" and "A Family Alliance."

    Harvest of Stories by Dorothy Canfield Fisher -- More short stories.

    Lives Other Than My Own by Emmanuel Carrère -- A bookish friend recommended this to me, and I headed to the library to get it. I found it so interesting that I then read...

    My Life as a Russian Novel by Emmanuel Carrère -- Also very interesting. So then...

    The Adversary: A True Story of Monstrous Deception by Emmanuel Carrère -- Interesting, very dark, like his other books, didn't unfold as I expected.

    The Loneliest Girl in the Universe by Lauren James -- My daughter Eleanor and I both raced through this book. Great suspense, more than one great twist.

    Fighting Angel by Pearl S. Buck -- My Pearl Buck obsession has run its course, I believe. This is the last book I feel compelled to read. Wait, never mind—I still want to re-read The Good Earth. This book is a memoir/biography about Buck's missionary father. If you're curious, I did an episode of "A Little Happier" where I discuss an anecdote that Buck tells about him elsewhere: "A Puzzling Story from the Life of Pearl S. Buck."

    The Four-Story Mistake by Elizabeth Enright -- So, so, so, so, SO good. On the list of 81, of course.

    Then There Were Five by Elizabeth Enright -- I've read it fifty times, if not more.

    Spiderweb for Two by Elizabeth Enright -- If you know me, you're thinking, "Hmmm, Gretchen is re-reading for the millionth time her favorite works of children's literature, and she's focusing on Elizabeth Enright. Does that mean she's feeling stressed out about something?" Answer: yes. That's my tell. But I'm feeling much calmer now.

    Lethal White by Robert Galbraith -- I will read anything that J. K. Rowling writes, under any pseudonym she chooses. In hardback!

    Nonrequired Reading by Wislawa Szymborska -- Little essays. Thought-provoking.

    Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler -- I read this years ago, and it was nothing like I remembered, which surprised me. A good, absorbing read.

    The World I Live In by Helen Keller -- Fascinating. What a life, what a mind.

    Nothing Good Can Come from This by Kristi Coulter -- I heard about this book on the terrific podcast But That's Another Story. A great book about quitting drinking, and much more. Bizarre coincidence: in the interview, Kristi Coulter mentioned that she loves Elizabeth Enright (see above)! And also Laurie Colwin, whom I also love.

    Aroma: The Cultural History of Smell by Constance Classen, David Howes, and Anthony Synnott -- Research for my next book. Can't learn enough about smell.

    Butcher's Crossing by John Williams -- I'm astonished I've never read this book before, or even heard of it. A really great book. Symbols and metaphors shooting off in all directions. (Though, if you've read it, do you agree with me that the ending was a bit off?)

    Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry -- Love, love, love this novel. Beautiful, haunting.

    Hannah Coulter by Wendell Berry -- Love this one too, but if you're thinking, "Of the two, which Berry novel did she like better?" I'd say Jayber Crow.

    The Outcasts: Brotherband Chronicles, Book 1 by John Flanagan -- I love this world, I keep reading more and more of these novels. This was a gift from a friend, such a treat.

    So You Want to Be a Wizard by Diane Duane -- Fun! A girl finds a magical book in the library, say no more.

    The Making of a Manager by Julie Zhuo -- In galley. Great insights into the challenges of being a manager. Zhuo is a manager at Facebook.

    What No One Ever Tells You by Dr. Alexandra Sacks and Dr. Catherine Birndorf -- In galley. Great insights into the challenges of being a new mother.

    If You're In My Office, It's Already Too Late by James J. Sexton -- Do's and don'ts from a divorce lawyer. I read about this book in the newspaper, and I just had to get a copy. In a nutshell: be nice to your sweetheart.

    Quantum Change by William R. Miller and Janet C'de Baca -- I've read this book before. It is absolutely fascinating. It's like nothing I've ever read before. I suppose it reminds me of The Varieties of Religious Experience.

    What are you reading this month?

     
  • feedwordpress 15:20:07 on 2018/09/28 Permalink
    Tags: #GretchenRubinReads, , , , ,   

    What I Read This Month: September 2018 

    For more than two years now, every Monday morning, I've posted a photo on my Facebook Page of the books I finished during the week, with the tag #GretchenRubinReads

    I get a big kick out of this weekly habit—it’s a way to shine a spotlight on all the terrific books that I’ve completed.

    As I write about in my book Better Than Before, for most of my life, my habit was to finish any book that I started. Finally, I realized that this approach meant that I spent time reading books that bored me, and I had less time for books that I truly enjoy. These days, I now put down a book if I don’t feel like finishing it, so I have more time to do my favorite kinds of reading.

    This habit means that if you see a book included in the #GretchenRubinReads photo, you know that I liked it well enough to read to the last page.

    If you’d like more ideas for habits to help you get more reading done, read this post or download my "Reading Better Than Before" worksheet.

    You can also follow me on Goodreads where I've recently started tracking books I’ve read.

    If you want to see what I read in August 2018, the full list is here.

    September 2018 Reading

    Turn: The Journal of an Artist by Anne Truitt - artist Anne Truitt wrote three brilliant memoirs; this is the third. I highly recommend all three.

    A Little Love Song by Michelle Magorian - by the author of Goodnight, Mr. Tom, a book I discovered recently. I really enjoyed this novel.

    Red, White, Blue by Lea Carpenter - Lea is a friend, so I couldn't wait to read her novel—and it's excellent.

    In This House of Brede by Rumer Godden - this is my second time reading this book, which I love. I love books about a spiritual consciousness.

    A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler - a great story, told beautifully, very thought-provoking. I sense an Anne Tyler phase coming on.

    True Enough by Stephen McCauley - I just discovered McCauley's work. I really enjoyed this novel.

    Property by Lionel Shriver - I love the work of Lionel Shriver. LOVE. I don't usually read short stores, but loved this book, especially the first and last stories.

    The Emigrants by W. G. Sebald - an unusual, fascinating way to approach a novel. I wish I could take a class in which we discussed it.

    Inheritance by Dani Shapiro - couldn't put this memoir down, read it in one or two days. And so timely! The widespread availability of DNA information has personally affected so many people I know.

    Stories of my Life by Katherine Paterson - how I love the work of Katherine Paterson. Odd fact: she and Pearl S. Buck were both the children of missionaries in China.

    Gone-Away Lake by Elizabeth Enright - I've read this book about fifty times. I never tire of it. So good.

    Behind the Scenes at the Museum by Kate Atkinson - this novel has been on my library list for years, really enjoyed it.

    Pearl S. Buck: A Cultural Biography by Peter Conn - Pearl Buck phase continues. What a life!

    Return to Gone-Away by Elizabeth Enright - see above. So, so, so, so, so good.

    Weetzie Bat by Francesca Block - this short YA novel isn't quite like anything I've ever read before. Very interesting.

    The Child Who Never Grew by Pearl S. Buck - more Pearl Buck. This short book, originally published in Ladies' Home Journal if I remember correctly, was ground-breaking. At the time, few parents publicly discussed their children with special needs. Buck was a tireless advocate for this community.

    Who is Rich? by Matthew Klam - I really enjoyed this novel, especially because it was a brilliant portrait of the Four Tendencies. The main character is an Obliger who goes into classic, full Obliger-rebellion. (I wrote more about Rich's Obliger-rebellion in this post.)

    The Fixer: My Adventures Saving Startups from Death by Politics by Bradley Tusk - Bradley is a friend, and it's always especially interesting to read a memoir by someone I know. This is a great one. You can listen to his interview on the Happier with Gretchen Rubin podcast here.

    The Italian Teacher by Tom Rachman - my husband had checked this novel out of the library and highly recommended it, so it was delivered into my hands. Very enjoyable. I've been meaning to read Rachman for a while.

    What are you reading this month?

     
  • feedwordpress 11:00:37 on 2018/08/31 Permalink
    Tags: #GretchenRubinReads, , , ,   

    What I Read This Month: August 2018. 

    For more than two years now, every Monday morning, I've posted a photo on my Facebook Page of the books I finished during the week, with the tag #GretchenRubinReads

    I get a big kick out of this weekly habit—it’s a way to shine a spotlight on all the terrific books that I’ve completed. It gives me the same satisfaction that I felt in grade school when we kept track of all the books we’d read on an “I’m a BookWorm” sheet.

    As I write about in my book Better Than Before, for most of my life, my habit was to finish any book that I started. Finally, I realized that this approach meant that I spent time reading books that bored me, and I had less time for books that I truly enjoy. These days, I now put down a book if I don’t feel like finishing it, so I have more time to do my favorite kinds of reading.

    This habit means that if you see a book included in the #GretchenRubinReads photo, you know that I liked it well enough to read to the last page.

    If you’d like more ideas for habits to help you get more reading done, you can read my post here.

    As an enthusiastic reader, I’m always trying to get ideas for new great books to try. For instance, I read the delightful British quarterly Slightly Foxed. Readers with the same challenge have asked me to create a list of the books I post, so that they can more easily read the titles and get ideas for books they may want to read.

    So, I'm trying this out. Let me know what you think. You can also follow me on Goodreads where I've recently started tracking books I’ve read—however, I must confess, I’m a bit scattershot about leaving specific comments there. You’ll also see that I have very eclectic tastes!

    If you want to see what I read in July 2018, the full list is here.

    August 2018 Reading

    My Several Worlds - Pearl S. Buck -- I'm on a bit of a Pearl S. Buck kick (see below)

    Sempre Susan - Sigrid Nunez -- I want to read more about Susan Sontag. From reading this memoir, I'm confident that she's a Rebel.

    Lord of Light - Robert Zelazny -- how had I never read this book before? Just my kind of thing.

    Letter from Peking - Pearl S. Buck -- more Buck!

    Spinning Silver - Naomi Novik -- Raced through this book. And if you haven't read Novik's novel His Majesty's Dragon, run don't walk; it's one of my very favorites. Speaking of the Four Tendencies, in His Majesty's Dragon the main character Captain Will Laurence is an Upholder, and the dragon Temeraire is a Questioner.

    Ranger's Apprentice: The Icebound Land - John Flanagan -- working my way through the whole "Ranger's Apprentice" series. A friend just gave me a Brotherband book as well.

    Anybody Can Do Anything - Betty MacDonald -- yes, this is the Betty MacDonald who wrote the brilliant Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle books! Her adult memoirs are terrific, too; she's best known for The Egg and I. This is a fascinating, funny account of what it was like for her, as a woman, to look for work during the Depression.

    The River - Rumer Godden -- how I love Rumer Godden. This was shelved in my library in Adult Fiction, but now that I've read it, I think it's more YA.

    Hourglass - Dani Shapiro -- this was actually a re-read; I read the memoir when it was first published. So thought-provoking. (Yes, I include re-reads in my weekly lists.)

    My Ex-Life - Stephen McCauley -- can't wait to read more by McCauley. I loved this novel.

    How it All Began - Penelope Lively -- a very compelling novel. It was perfect for an airplane ride, and that's one of the highest compliments I can pay a book.

    What are you reading this month?

     
  • feedwordpress 09:00:45 on 2018/07/30 Permalink
    Tags: #GretchenRubinReads, , , ,   

    What I read this month: July 2018 

    For more than two years now, every Monday morning, I've posted a photo on my Facebook Page of the books I finished during the week, with the tag #GretchenRubinReads

    I get a big kick out of this weekly habit – it’s a way to shine a spotlight on all the terrific books that I’ve completed. It gives me the same satisfaction that I felt in grade school when we kept track of all the books we’d read on an “I’m a BookWorm” sheet.

    As I write about in my book Better Than Before, for most of my life, my habit was to finish any book that I started. Finally, I realized that this approach meant that I spent time reading books that bored me, and I had less time for books that I truly enjoy. These days, I now put down a book if I don’t feel like finishing it, so I have more time to do my favorite kinds of reading.

    This habit means that if you see a book included in the #GretchenRubinReads photo, you know that I liked it well enough to read to the last page.

    If you’d like more ideas for habits to help you get more reading done, you can read my post here.

    As an enthusiastic reader, I’m always trying to get ideas for new great books to try. For instance, I read the delightful British quarterly Slightly Foxed. Readers with the same challenge have asked me to create a list of the books I post, so that they can more easily read the titles and get ideas for books they may want to read.

    So, I'm trying this out. Let me know what you think. You can also follow me on Goodreads where I've recently started tracking books I’ve read – however, I must confess, I’m a bit scattershot about leaving specific comments there. You’ll also see that I have very eclectic tastes!

     

    July 2018 Reading

    Ancillary Justice - Ann Leckie

    Hot Milk - Deborah Levy

    Johnson on Savage: The Life of Mr. Richard Savage - Richard Holmes and Samuel Johnson

    Line Color Form: The Language of Art and Design - Jesse Day

    The Heart's Invisible Furies - John Boyne

    Angle of Repose - Wallace Stegner

    Shadows on the Rock - Willa Cather

    Less - Andrew Sean Greer

    The Violet Hour: Great Writers at the End - Katie Roiphe

    The Practicing Stoic: A Philosophical User's Manual - Ward Farnsworth

    Second Nature: A Gardener's Education - Michael Pollan

    Accidental Icon: Musings of a Geriatric Starlet - Iris Apfel

    Peacock and Vine: On William Morris and Mariano FortunyA.S. Byatt

    Willa Cather on Writing: Critical Studies on Writing as an Art - Willa Cather

    Maxims - La Rochefoucauld

    Tuesdays at the Castle - Jessica Day George

    My Summer in a Garden - Charles Dudley Warner

    Searching for Caleb - Anne Tyler

    A Bridge for Passing: A Meditation on Love, Loss, and Faith - Pearl S. Buck

    What the Nose Knows - Avery Gilbert

    Flower Confidential: The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful - Amy Stewart

    From the Ground Up - Amy Stewart

    The Solitary Summer - Elizabeth Von Arnim

    Mr. Skeffington - Elizabeth Von Armin

    Ranger's Apprentice: The Ruins of Gorlan - John Flanagan

    Back Home - Michelle Magorian

     

    What are you reading this month?

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
esc
cancel