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  • gretchenrubin 12:08:19 on 2017/08/02 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Popular Culture, , ,   

    Podcast 128: Connect with TV, Conquering the Snooze Alarm–and Is It Possible to be a Mix of the Four Tendencies? 

    Update: Elizabeth is excited because tomorrow on the “Happier in Hollywood” podcast, she and Sarah talk about a very common happiness stumbling block: self-criticism. When is it helpful, and when is it toxic?

    I’m excited because my new book, The Four Tendencies, hits the shelves in just 41 days. So close, and yet so far!

    Pre-orders give a big boost to a book, so to thank readers who pre-order, I worked with a terrific production team to create a series of videos about the Four Tendencies. After the book goes on sale, I’ll charge for these videos, but until then, you can get access to them for free if you pre-order. Find all the info here. There’s an overview video, then subject videos on using the Four Tendencies at work, with spouses and sweethearts, with children and students, and in health-care settings.

    Try This at Home:  Connect through television. On episode 9 of “Happier in Hollywood,” the weekly “Hollywood Hack” was to “watch the TV shows your boss watches” to create an easy way to connect.

    But TV is a great way to connect not only with a boss, but also with co-workers, teenagers, grandparents…many relationships. Have you ever used TV to strengthen an important relationship?

    I quote from Tyler Cowen’s Discover You Inner Economist: Use Incentives to Fall in Love, Survive Your Next Meeting, and Your Motivate Your Dentist.

    Happiness Hack: Put your alarm device across the room, so you have to get out of bed in order to turn off the noise.

    1pix

    Four Tendencies Tip: If you want to take the Quiz, to see whether you’re an Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, or Rebel, it’s here.

    People often suggest that they think they’re a mix of Tendencies, but I argue that just about every one of us does fall into one core Tendency.

    That said, the Tendencies do overlap, and it’s possible to “tip” to a Tendency that overlaps with your core Tendency. For instance, I’m an UPHOLDER/Questioner, and Elizabeth is an OBLIGER/Questioner.

    Listener Question: Debbie asks how to figure out if she truly finds it fun to pursue the outdoor activities that her husband loves.

    Elizabeth’s Demerit: Elizabeth has started playing a new app game, Two Dots.

    Gretchen’s Gold Star: I managed to stay (reasonably) calm while Eliza and I were shopping for some things she needs for college.


    Three Resources:

    1. To get the pre-order bonus, you can find info here, or at happiercast.com/4tbonus. You’ll get the overview video as well as subject videos on using the Four Tendencies at work, with spouses and sweethearts, with children and students, and in health-care settings.  Free now; after the book comes out, there will be a charge for the video series.
    2.  I do weekly live videos on my Facebook Page to continue the conversation from the podcast — usually on Tuesdays at 3:00 pm ET. To join the conversation, check the schedule.

    If you want easy instructions about how to rate or review the podcast, look here. Remember, it really helps us if you do rate or review the podcast — it helps other listeners discover us.

    As I mentioned above, I do weekly live videos on my Facebook Page to continue the conversation from the podcast — usually on Tuesdays at 3:00 pm ET. To join the conversation, check the schedule.

    As always, thanks to our terrific sponsors

    Check out Stamps.com. Want to avoid trips to the post office, and buy and print official U.S. postage for any letter or package, right from your own computer and printer? Visit Stamps.com to sign up for a 4-week trial,  including postage and a digital scale — just enter the promo code HAPPIER.

    Check out Lyft  — join the ride-sharing company that believes in treating its people better. Go to Lyft.com/happier to get a $500 new-driver bonus. Limited time only.

    Also check out ThirdLove, the lingerie brand that uses real women’s measurements to design better-fitting bras. Try one of their bestselling bras for free, for 30 days, by visiting ThirdLove.com/happier.

     

    We love hearing from listeners:

     

    To sign up for my free monthly newsletter, text me at 66866 and enter the word (surprise) “happier.“ Or click here.

    If you enjoyed the podcast, please tell your friends and give us a rating or review. Click here to tell your friends on Twitter.

    Listeners really respect the views of other listeners, so your response helps people find good material. (Not sure how to review? Instructions here; scroll to the bottom.)

    How to Subscribe

    If you’re like me (until recently) you’re intrigued by podcasts, but you don’t know how to listen or subscribe. It’s very easy, really. Really.  To listen to more than one episode, and to have it all in a handier way, on your phone or tablet, it’s better to subscribe. Really, it’s easy.

    Want to know what to expect from other episodes of the podcast, when you listen to the award-winning Happier with Gretchen Rubin?” We talk about how to build happier habits into everyday life, as we draw from cutting-edge science, ancient wisdom, lessons from pop culture—and our own experiences (and mistakes).  We’re sisters, so we don’t let each other get away with much!

    Want a new podcast to listen to, with the same vibe as Happier? The Onward Project is the family of podcasts that I’ve launched, for podcasts that are about “your life–made better.” Check out these great shows: Side Hustle School and Radical Candor and Happier in Hollywood.

    HAPPIER listening!

    The post Podcast 128: Connect with TV, Conquering the Snooze Alarm–and Is It Possible to be a Mix of the Four Tendencies? appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • gretchenrubin 15:50:15 on 2017/04/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , Popular Culture, ,   

    Observations from Marie Kondo about the Life-Changing Magic of Creating Good Habits. 

    Marie Kondo

    Interview: Marie Kondo.

    It’s hard to exaggerate the influence that Marie Kondo has wrought with her blockbuster books The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up and Spark Joy. The latter book takes its name, of course, from the question she urges us to ask ourselves, “Does this possession spark joy?”

    Her ideas about how to create order and fight clutter have helped countless people to give themselves more energy and peace. (You might ask, “How does something paradoxically give you more energy and give you more peace?” and I would say, “That is exactly the effect of clutter-clearing.“)

    The New York Times called her “perhaps the world’s only decluttering celebrity.” Absolutely!

    Even I don’t agree with everything that Marie Kondo prescribes (as I write about here), I’m a huge fan of her work. It’s practical, thought-provoking, and often surprising. For most of us, outer order contributes to inner calm, and her “KonMari method” resonates with many, many people.

    One thing I love is that alongside detailed instructions for how to fold a t-shirt, Marie Kondo makes observations like this: “Tidying is the act of confronting yourself; cleaning is the act of confronting nature.” Profound.

    In my books The Happiness Project and Happier at Home (can’t resist mentioning–both bestsellers), I write a lot about the role of possessions in building a happy life. It’s a fascinating area.

    I was thrilled to get the chance to ask Marie Kondo questions about happiness and good habits.

    Would you describe yourself as an Upholder, a Questioner, a Rebel, or an Obliger?

    In terms of tidying, I’m definitely an Upholder. I stay tidy because I feel that the effects ground me and allow my home to spark joy for my family and me.  However, I’m not sure if I qualify as an Upholder in other aspects, as I’ll procrastinate submitting written work or sometimes show up late to get-togethers with friends or colleagues!

    Perhaps this makes me a Questioner, as I’ll only do things if, when I ask myself: “Does it spark joy?” and the answer is “yes.” My very profession is centered on encouraging others to ask themselves: “Does it spark joy?” This must qualify me as a Questioner! [Yes, that sounds Questioner to me.]

    Does anything tend to interfere with your ability to keep your healthy habits?

    I usually go to bed early and wake up early with my kids, who are 18 and 5 months old. However, because I travel frequently for work, I’ll sometimes get jet-lagged. This can disrupt my sleep pattern for a couple of days after! When this happens, I get a little anxious that I am getting behind on work or missing out on time spent with my daughters while I try to catch up on rest.

    Simply having children can interfere with healthy habits!  For instance, before bed, I usually like to stretch and release any tension that may have developed over the course of the day. However, if one of my daughters cries or calls out for me, I’ll tend to them and, by the time they’re calmed down, I’m tempted to pass on stretching and head straight to bed.

    Have you ever been hit by a lightning bolt, where you changed a major habit very suddenly, as a consequence of reading a book, a conversation with a friend, a milestone birthday, a health scare, etc.?

    When I was 15, I would continually tidy my room, only to have it become cluttered again shortly after.  This cycle contributed to so much stress that one day, I fainted. This breaking point made me realize that I was approaching tidying the wrong way.  Instead of focusing on discarding things and approaching tidying as the removal of negativity, I realized that I needed to focus on finding and keeping things that spark joy.

    Do you embrace habits or resist them?

    For daily life, I try to keep to routines, but for work, I prefer variety. For example, I get new ideas by traveling and exposing myself to other countries’ cultures. I enjoy giving talks in a variety of locations, because it allows me to interact with different people and learn from their diverse perspectives.

    Has another person ever had a big influence on your habits?

    My grandmother taught me the importance of tidying up even those places you don’t openly see, such as the insides of drawers and bureaus.  She recognized the intrinsic beauty in belongings and took pride in their presentation in her home.  When she dressed and accessorized, she applied the same philosophy to her personal appearance – everything mattered.  I developed my initial respect for my belongings as a result of her influence.

    The post Observations from Marie Kondo about the Life-Changing Magic of Creating Good Habits. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • gretchenrubin 18:20:05 on 2017/04/14 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Popular Culture, Taylor Swift, , , upholder,   

    Fun with the Four Tendencies: Is Taylor Swift an Upholder? 

    I spend a lot of time thinking about my personality framework, the Four Tendencies. It’s an endlessly fascinating thing to study.

    If you don’t know if you’re an Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, or Rebel — and why it matters — you can take the quick quiz here. (More than 640,000 people have taken the quiz.)

    I’m always on the watch for Tendencies in the world. Now, we generally can’t judge people’s Tendency by what they do; we need to know how they think.

    But sometimes patterns of behaviors are so consistent that they do suggest a Tendency.

    My sister Elizabeth told me that she thinks that Taylor Swift is an Upholder. It’s not easy to tell, because of course a mega-star like Swift has a persona that’s carefully crafted for public consumption. However, judging from external factors, I agree, she sure looks like an Upholder.

    She seems to meet outer expectations very patiently and professionally—not only those related to her extensive music and business responsibilities, but also involving time-consuming, inefficient tasks like going on press tours, handling paparazzi, and putting up with all the nonsense that super-stars must endure. She meets a very high level of expectations, with no visible sign of resentment or burn-out or frustration at inefficiency.

    She has no trouble resisting the advice of her record label, and she also has no trouble following the advice of her record label. She doesn’t seem to feel pushed around by the press, social media, or her own team. In a cover profile in GQ magazine, Chuck Klosterman observed of Swift, “There is a perpetual sense that nothing about her career is accidental and that nothing about her life is unmediated. These are not unusual thoughts to have about young mainstream stars. But what’s different with Swift is her autonomy. There is no Svengali directing her career; there is no stage mother pushing her toward the spotlight. She is in total control of her own constructed reality.”

    Plus Swift exhibits an extraordinary level of self-discipline, and she’s often criticized for being “unspontaneous.” Now, what Tendency does that sound like?

     I suspect that Upholders in the entertainment business, and in the arts, sometimes go out of their way to hide their Tendency—to present themselves as more wild and more hedonistic than they actually are.

    Upholderness isn’t a very glamorous, edgy, or endearing quality. It doesn’t contribute to a fascinating biography or make good magazine copy. In her mega-hit song “Shake It Off,” Taylor Swift sings, “I stay up too late…I go on too many dates…At least that’s what people say.” Does she stay up too late? Hmmm. I wonder. 

    What do you think?

    In other news about the Four Tendencies, very soon I will be able to reveal the jacket for the book The Four Tendencies — I’m about to be able to take down that dull placeholder cover. Exciting! If you’re inclined to buy the book, it’s a big help to me if you pre-order (pre-orders help build buzz for a book among booksellers, the media, and the public). But only if you want to, of course!

    The post Fun with the Four Tendencies: Is Taylor Swift an Upholder? appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • gretchenrubin 23:05:27 on 2017/04/06 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , Popular Culture, Rex Tillerson, , ,   

    Obliger-Spotting in the News? Rex Tillerson on Becoming Secretary of State. 

    As I may have mentioned, I’m obsessed with my Four Tendencies framework, in which I divide all of humanity into four types: Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, and Rebel. (Don’t know your Tendency? Take the short quiz here.)

    As I go through my days, I’m always searching for greater understanding of the Four Tendencies; I search for patterns and insight. Am I right that Rebel children are often especially close to their grandparents? Do many Questioners love to share links and articles?

    I also constantly search for examples of the Four Tendencies in real life and in memoirs, movies, novels, and TV shows.

    It’s crucial to remember that we can’t determine a person’s Tendency from the outside — we need to know why a person talks or behaves a certain way.

    But at the same time, it’s true that sometimes people do say things that seem to be a powerful indication of Tendency. I was struck by this fact when I read about an interview with Rex Tillerson.

    Rex Tillerson, the former CEO of Exxon Mobil Corp, was named by President Trump to be Secretary of State.

    In an interview about his new position, Secretary Tillerson said, “I didn’t want this job. I didn’t seek this job.”

    He explained that his wife “told me I’m supposed to do this.” She also told him, “God’s not through with you.”

    Secretary Tillerson added, “I was supposed to retire in March, this month. I was going to the ranch to be with my grandkids.”

    “My wife convinced me…She was right. I’m supposed to do this.”

    To me, this sounds like an Obliger. The expectation is coming from the outside. What do you think?

    Of course, because Obliger is the largest Tendency, it’s also likely that Tillerson is an Obliger because that’s the Tendency a person is most likely to belong to.

    From these comments, Secretary Tillerson doesn’t sound particularly enthusiastic about this responsibility. Obligers have told me, however, that they’ve had the experience of starting a position because they felt obliged by an outer expectation, and then finding a real passion for that position. Sometimes passion follows, rather than leads, as we grapple with a new expectation.

    What’s your view?

    (Note: These days, any mention of politics can bring out people’s combative sides. Please keep the conversation civil and about the TENDENCIES.)

    My book The Four Tendencies will hit the shelves in September. If you’re inclined to buy the book, it’s a big help to me if you pre-order it now. Pre-orders are extremely important for building buzz and support for a book among booksellers, the media, and the publisher.

    The post Obliger-Spotting in the News? Rex Tillerson on Becoming Secretary of State. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • gretchenrubin 15:11:29 on 2017/03/15 Permalink
    Tags: Before Sunrise, , , , , , , movie, , , Popular Culture, , shower, , , , ,   

    Podcast 108: Use Your Shower as a “Happiness Booth,” Use Your Smart-Phone as a Magnifier, and a Question from the Movie “Before Sunrise.” 

    Happier with Gretchen Rubin

    It’s time for the next installment of Happier with Gretchen Rubin.

    Update: Along with her writing partner Sarah Fain, Elizabeth is busy getting ready to launch her new podcast Happier in Hollywood. And by the way, if you love listening to podcasts, this is the month of “#Trypod,” when we’re all helping people discover new podcasts or help show them how to listen to podcasts. So encourage people to #Trypod.

    Try This at Home: We got this idea from our listener Rebecca: Use your shower as a “happiness booth.”

    If you want to hear our interview with Rosanne Cash in episode 22, and hear a clip from “When the Master Calls the Roll,” listen here.

    Happiness Hack: You can use the camera on your smart-phone as a magnifying glass. Who knew?

    Know Yourself Better: Inspired by the 1995 movie Before Sunrise, we discuss the question: Do you feel more like Celine, who feels like an old woman looking back on her life, or more like Jesse, who feels like a kid pretending to be a grown-up?

    If you’re interested in this idea of “anticipatory nostalgia,” I talk about it at the conclusion of my book Happier at Home.

    Here’s my one-minute video, The Years Are Short.

    Listener Question: Our listener Cindy likes to go for a walk by herself during lunch, but now her boss wants to join her. How does she maintain her solo walk?

    Demerit: Elizabeth has the habit of falling asleep when she’s putting Jack to bed at night, taking a nap, and then staying up for another few hours.

    Gold Star: I give gold star to our mother and father related to signing up for exercise training sessions.

     

    If you want easy instructions about how to rate or review the podcast, look here. Remember, it really helps us if you do rate or review the podcast — it helps other listeners discover us.

    I do weekly live videos on my Facebook Page to continue the conversation from the podcast — usually on Tuesdays at 3:00 pm ET. To join the conversation, check the schedule.

    As always, thanks to our terrific sponsors

    Check out Stamps.com. Want to avoid trips to the post office, and buy and print official U.S. postage for any letter or package, right from your own computer and printer? Visit Stamps.com to sign up for a 4-week trial,  including postage and a digital scale — just enter the promo code HAPPIER.

    Also check out StitchFix, an online personal styling service with real stylists who handpick clothing for you — your taste, your schedule, your lifestyle, your budget. Sign up at StitchFix.com.

    And check out Smith and Noble, the solution for beautiful window treatments. Go to smithandnoble.com/happier for 20% off window treatments and free in-home or on-phone design consultations and free professional measuring.

    We love hearing from listeners:

     

    To sign up for my free monthly newsletter, text me at 66866 and enter the word (surprise) “happier.“ Or click here.

    If you enjoyed the podcast, please tell your friends and give us a rating or review. Click here to tell your friends on Twitter.

    Listeners really respect the views of other listeners, so your response helps people find good material. (Not sure how to review? Instructions here; scroll to the bottom.)

    How to Subscribe

    If you’re like me (until recently) you’re intrigued by podcasts, but you don’t know how to listen or subscribe. It’s very easy, really. Really.  To listen to more than one episode, and to have it all in a handier way, on your phone or tablet, it’s better to subscribe. Really, it’s easy.

    Want to know what to expect from other episodes of the podcast, when you listen to the award-winning Happier with Gretchen Rubin?” We talk about how to build happier habits into everyday life, as we draw from cutting-edge science, ancient wisdom, lessons from pop culture—and our own experiences (and mistakes).  We’re sisters, so we don’t let each other get away with much!

    Want a new podcast to listen to, with the same vibe as Happier? The Onward Project is the family of podcasts that I’ve launched, for podcasts that are about “your life–made better.” The first shows are Side Hustle School and Radical Candor. Elizabeth’s show with her writing partner, Sarah Fain, will be Happier in Hollywood, so stay tuned for that.

    HAPPIER listening!

    The post Podcast 108: Use Your Shower as a “Happiness Booth,” Use Your Smart-Phone as a Magnifier, and a Question from the Movie “Before Sunrise.” appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • gretchenrubin 17:42:20 on 2017/03/09 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Popular Culture, , , taxi, Taxi TV,   

    Have You Ever Championed a Book That Your Book Club Disliked? I Have. 

    I always get a big kick out of any mention of me or my work in the press, on TV, wherever.

    So it was very fun to be included in Erin Geiger Smith’s Wall Street Journal piece, “When You Bomb at the Book Club.

    I’m in four book clubs (one regular, three for children’s literature), so I’ve made my share of recommendations that other people didn’t like.

    The piece is behind a paywall, but I get mentioned here:

    Author Gretchen Rubin is a prolific reader and a member of four New York City-based book clubs. She suggests monthly reads for 65,000 subscribers to her online “book club.” But the selection of Sylvia Engdahl’s futuristic 1970s novel “This Star Shall Abide” for her personal children’s literature book club baffled fellow members. “They didn’t like the writing, they didn’t like the twist,” Ms. Rubin says.

    She also recalled a lot of pushback for Frances Hodgson Burnett’s children’s book “The Secret Garden,” which she calls “a towering classic of world literature.” She expected an enthusiastic discussion. Instead, multiple members expressed their opinion the first half felt disconnected from the rest, and that they just didn’t like it in general. For some, “If you don’t like their choice, it really upsets them, whereas me, I’m like, ‘If you don’t like “The Secret Garden,” there’s something wrong with you,’ ” Ms. Rubin says, somewhat jokingly.

    I mean, who doesn’t love The Secret Garden? I’m still baffled by that.

    Have you ever suggested a book that your book club didn’t like?

    In other spottings around town, my podcast Happier gets a fleeting but definite mention in….Taxi TV!

    For all of you non-New-Yorkers, New York City taxis have little screens in the back that show clips of TV shows, news updates, and ads. In an ad for New York City as a center of podcasting, Happier gets a mention. Fun!

    I tried to take a photo, but I’m too slow on the draw.

    The post Have You Ever Championed a Book That Your Book Club Disliked? I Have. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:02:46 on 2017/02/02 Permalink
    Tags: Bill Murray, faults, Groundhog Day, , Popular Culture,   

    A Happiness Lesson from Bill Murray in “Groundhog Day.” 

    Today is Groundhog Day, and that reminds me of one of my favorite movies…yes, Groundhog Day!

    In Groundhog Day, the main character Phil Connors (Bill Murray) — a nasty, selfish guy — keeps living the same day, over and over, and repeating the same mistakes, day after day after day, until he learns to be a wiser, more loving person. It’s a brilliant, hilarious, deep movie.

    This year, February 2 is Groundhog Day, and the occasion has made me reflect of the way I keep making the same happiness mistakes, over and over.

    Elizabeth and I have talked about this on the Happier podcast. Now that we’ve been recording episodes for two years, we’re starting to repeat certain demerits that we’ve given ourselves. Because even when we know we’re doing something that’s not good for our happiness, sometimes we still do it.

    I’m very crabby with my family when we’re traveling, even when I know it doesn’t help.

    I leave my clothes in a heap in a corner of the bedroom, even though I know that the clutter gets on my nerve.

    I procrastinate about making phone calls, even though I know I’d be happier if I just crossed that task off my list.

    I “snap” at my family, even when I know that my bad mood puts everyone else in a bad mood too.

    Etc., etc.

    I get so tired of my own faults, my own limitations! I wish I could vanquish them, once and for all. But instead, it’s like Groundhog Day.

    That’s one of the reasons that I’m so happy to eat a low-carb diet. I used to think about sweets too much — it was so boring and draining. “One, two, three?” “Now, later?” “Is this too much?’

    Now that I don’t eat that kind of food, all that noise is gone.

    I wish I could solve other issues the same way — to just be done with them. I know that as an Upholder, it’s probably easier for me to make certain kinds of changes than it is for other people, but still, it’s tough.

    But I remind myself that just like Phil Connors, every day is a new day for me to act in a way that will make me (and also other people) happier.

    The post A Happiness Lesson from Bill Murray in “Groundhog Day.” appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 08:48:51 on 2017/01/26 Permalink
    Tags: Mary Tyler Moore, , Popular Culture, , tribute, ,   

    The Thought of Mary Tyler Moore Always Makes Me Happy. 

    I was so sad to hear that Mary Tyler Moore has died. What a presence she had in our imaginations! Her show was on from 1970-1977, and yet the character she played is still familiar.

    In 1999, the magazine Entertainment Weekly chose Mary Richards’s tossing her hat into the air as the second-great TV moment of the 1970s.

    For me, it’s one of the happiest moments of all of TV. It gives me a chill, and lifts my spirits, every time I see it. It’s a moment of joyful, unself-conscious exuberance.

    What an extraordinary image to leave behind.

    The post The Thought of Mary Tyler Moore Always Makes Me Happy. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 17:20:36 on 2016/10/17 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , law, , network, , Popular Culture, , , , ,   

    A Little Happier: Do What You Love, and Then Your Friends Hire You. 

    annleslie

    I was reminded of this Secret of Adulthood just again last night. At a party, I was talking to someone I’d known from law school, who had gone on to be a very well-established artist.

    I asked her how she made this (fairly unusual) transition. It was a long, interesting story, and at one point she said, “I got to know a lot of artists, just from going to shows and doing all the things that interested me.” Those artists didn’t hire her, but knowing them helped her make the shift.

    Plus I was recently at another party, also with a bunch of friends from law school and from my clerkship with Justice O’Connor. They were mostly working as lawyers or in business, and they said how funny it was that many of them now were the clients of others, and that it was fun to work together in this way.

    Of course, this observation wouldn’t be true in every kind of career, but it does seem to me that when we follow our natural interests and inclinations, we readily form the relationships that can help us to succeed.

    Agree, disagree?

     

    Check out Yogi Tea. When it comes to enjoying life, little moments — like drinking a delicious cup of tea — can make a big difference.

    Want to get the “Moment of Happiness,” the free email newsletter I send out each day, with a terrific quote about happiness or human nature? Sign up here.

    Want to get in touch? I love hearing from listeners:

     

    Happier listening!

    The post A Little Happier: Do What You Love, and Then Your Friends Hire You. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 12:14:02 on 2016/10/08 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , markers, , pencils, Popular Culture, , , ,   

    Ta-Da! Announcing…My Coloring Book of Great Quotes. Do You Love to Color? 

    ColoringBookHappinessProjectRubin

    I’m excited to announce that I’ve created — yes! — a coloring book. Check it out: The Happiness Project Mini Posters: A Coloring Book of 20 Hand-Lettered Quotes to Pull Out and Frame.

    It was a particular delight to be creating a coloring book now, given my recent obsession with color, and accompanying obsession with beautiful markers and colored pencils.

    Also, it’s a big trend across the United States. (Is coloring becoming a popular adult activity in other countries?) More and more adults are returning to the coloring books they loved as children.

    Great idea! Coloring boosts happiness for many reasons.

    1. Coloring is calming, even meditative.

    The activity of coloring helps to focus the mind and rest the body in a constructive, creative way. In this book, you’re coloring various quotations, and II hope that the quotations, too, will inspire quiet reflection.

    2. Coloring is very satisfying, because there’s a special pleasure in doing things with our hands.

    Very often these days, we’re sitting behind screens and living in our heads. Like activities such as knitting or tying flies, coloring allows us to connect with the physical world, in the present moment. And there’s something about the repetitive, wordless nature of the work that boosts creativity and energy.

    3. Coloring is a great activity to do with other people.

    Research shows that a secret—probably the secret—to happiness is strong connections with other people. Coloring is fun to do with other people. It’s companionable, and allows for conversation, and at the same time, gives a sense of shared purpose.

    With my sister Elizabeth Craft, I host a podcast, Happier with Gretchen Rubin. Many people have written to tell me that they like to color as they listen to the latest episode—the two activities are highly compatible.

    How about you? Do you like to color? And if so: markers or pencils? Or both — I love both.

    The post Ta-Da! Announcing…My Coloring Book of Great Quotes. Do You Love to Color? appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
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