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  • feedwordpress 17:33:48 on 2016/10/01 Permalink
    Tags: actor, Juliette Lewis, , Popular Culture, , , The Happiness Projet   

    Fun! Actor Juliette Lewis Talks about “The Happiness Project” in Us Weekly Magazine. 

    juliettelewis

    Well, Juliette Lewis admits that she hasn’t actually read The Happiness Project — but she wants to read it.1pix

    She says, “I love self-help books. I got one from the airport called The Happiness Project. It’s unopened, but who knows — it might teach me how to be more happy. We will see.”

    I always get a big kick out of seeing my book mentioned — and I spotted it in the pile of objects, too.

    JulietteLewisWhatsInBag

    The post Fun! Actor Juliette Lewis Talks about “The Happiness Project” in Us Weekly Magazine. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 15:58:22 on 2016/08/30 Permalink
    Tags: , cancer, celebrities, , , fundamental attribution error, Gene Wilder, Gilda Radner, Popular Culture,   

    In Honor of Gene Wilder, a Lesson about Happiness that I Learned from Wilder and Gilda Ratner. 

    genewilder

    I was very sad to hear the news that Gene Wilder died. I’ll never forget him as Willie Wonka — limping down the path outside of his chocolate factory, then dropping into a somersault and springing to his feet.

    In honor of his death, I wanted to re-post something I wrote nine years ago, about Wilder and his wife, comedian Gilda Radner.

    Here it is, from 2007:

    One thing I do for The Happiness Project is to read memoirs of catastrophe – people who have gone through cancer, divorce, death, etc.

    Several months ago I read Gilda Radner’s interesting memoir, It’s Always Something, and yesterday I finished Gene Wilder’s equally interesting memoir, Kiss Me Like a Stranger. The two were married when she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and died, so reading the two memoirs gives a window into that experience from both perspectives.

    One thing that made this story particularly striking to me is that I remember seeing Gilda Radner and Gene Wilder together, many years ago. It was in a drugstore somewhere in New York City, I can’t remember where. I do remember that Gilda Radner was carrying a little dog (named Sparkle, I know now after reading these memoirs).

    A very peculiar aspect of fame is that fact that strangers remember the most fleeting encounters with you; it’s astonishing, really, that I remember seeing the two of them, for just a moment, so long ago.

    One reason that I remember them was that I remarked on how serious they both seemed. They were speaking in low, intense voices and looked solemn. “Well, maybe they’re only funny and light-hearted when they’re acting,” I thought. “Maybe that’s how famous comedians are in person. Or maybe they’re trying to be inconspicuous, because they’re famous.”

    In fact, this might have been the very day that Gilda Radner got a terrible report from her doctor. When I intersected with them would’ve been about the same time that she was sick. What for me was an ordinary day, with the fun of a celebrity sighting, might have been one of the worst days of their lives.

    This is a perfect example of the fundamental attribution error — which Wikipedia defines as “the tendency for people to over-emphasize dispositional, or personality-based, explanations for behaviors observed in others while under-emphasizing situational explanations. In other words, people have an unjustified tendency to assume that a person’s actions depend on what ‘kind’ of person that person is rather than on the social and environmental forces influencing the person.

    I assumed that Radner’s and Wilder’s behavior reflected their characters as celebrities and comedians and actors; it never occurred to me that their behavior might reflect something happening to them.

    Which reminds me – I should always cut people slack; always assume that their irritability, or unfriendliness, or absent-mindedness, neither reflects their true nature nor has anything to do with me. In brief, don’t take things personally. As Henri-Frederic Amiel wrote, “Life is short and we never have enough time for the hearts of those who travel the way with us. O, be swift to love! Make haste to be kind.”

    The post In Honor of Gene Wilder, a Lesson about Happiness that I Learned from Wilder and Gilda Ratner. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 12:27:07 on 2016/08/01 Permalink
    Tags: , , Dr. Seuss, , , , , , Popular Culture, , , , ,   

    A Little Happier: Important Lesson from Dr. Seuss–It’s Fun to Have Fun, But You Have to Know How. 

    catinhatjuggling

    The Cat in the Hat said it, and it’s a truth that I feel more deeply with every year that passes: It’s fun to have fun, but you have to know how — and that may take some serious reflection.

    Research shows that the absence of “feeling bad” doesn’t mean that we “feel good.” We must actually strive to find sources of “feeling good.” Having fun on a regular basis is a pillar of happiness.

    As you ask yourself, “How can I have more fun?” keep two things in mind:

    1. Be honest about what’s actually fun for you. It’s a Secret of Adulthood: just because something is fun for someone else doesn’t mean it’s fun for you, and vice versa. Wine-tasting, skiing, baking bread, reading mysteries—I personally do not enjoy any of these “fun” activities. They’re fun for some people; not for me. Don’t try to be self-improving, and don’t plan a “fun” event based on what other people would enjoy. Make time for something that’s fun for YOU.

    2. Do have real fun. I often feel so overwhelmed by tasks that I think, “The most fun would be to cross some items off my to-do list. I’d feel so much better if I could get something accomplished.” In fact, though, I just make myself feel trapped and drained. If I take time to do something that’s truly fun for me (re-read All the King’s Men for the fourth time, call my sister), I feel better able to tackle that to-do list.

    In case Dr. Seuss hasn’t convinced you, I’ll also invoke Samuel Butler:

    “One can bring no greater reproach against a man than to say that he does not set sufficient value upon pleasure, and there is no greater sign of a fool than the thinking that he can tell at once and easily what it is that pleases him. To know this is not easy, and how to extend our knowledge of it is the highest and most neglected of all arts and branches of education.”

    An example from my own life: I always knew that I found it fun to read children’s and young-adult literature, but I never paid much attention to that passion; when I made this activity a major pastime, by acknowledging what I found fun and starting three kidlit reading groups, instead of pushing it to the corners of my life, I dramatically ramped up the fun I got from it. (Read about these groups in the Wall Street Journal and New York Times.)

    How about you? Have you ever had trouble finding fun, or making time for fun? It’s fun to have fun, but you have to know how.

    Want to get in touch? I love hearing from listeners:

     

    Happier listening!

    The post A Little Happier: Important Lesson from Dr. Seuss–It’s Fun to Have Fun, But You Have to Know How. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:00:52 on 2016/07/26 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , Popular Culture,   

    What Are the Funniest Movies? 11 Suggestions to Get You Thinking. 

    shrek-movie-image

    I have a friend who’s going through a very rough patch, and I said to him, “You need to take short breaks from your worries. Why don’t you make an effort to watch funny movies? They’ll give you a little boost, when you’re feeling low. And taking good care of yourself will help you deal with this situation better.”

    He agreed, but as we were talking about it, he said, “Maybe it’s because of everything I’m dealing with, but I can’t think of anything I want to see. The only funny movie I can think of is Caddyshack. And I’m not even a huge fan of Caddyshack.

    So I want to make him a long list of funny movies, Some thoughtful, some goofy, some old, some new, so he has something for every mood. I’m sure this list could be much longer.

    What movies have I overlooked — or never seen myself?

     

    Watching funny movies or TV is a great way to get a quick mood boost. It’s true: laughter is good medicine.

    It made me happier just to think about these movies! This list would make a great appendix to my book about happiness, The Happiness Project.

    What movie can make you laugh, every time?

    The post What Are the Funniest Movies? 11 Suggestions to Get You Thinking. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 19:22:35 on 2016/06/27 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , generosity, , , , , Popular Culture, , , story-telling,   

    A Little Happier: Bill Clinton and Rob Lowe’s Son Give a Lesson in Happiness. 

    Rob Lowe

    I don’t often read celebrity memoirs, but my sister Elizabeth and others told me that actor Rob Lowe’s Stories I Only Tell My Friends was terrific, so I decided to read it myself.

    They’re right — it’s a great book. This episode, in particular, really stuck in my mind. Rob Lowe recounts:

    On my last visit to the Clinton White House, I’m standing on the South Lawn with [my wife] Sheryl and the boys talking to the president before he hops onto Marine One. My youngest son, Johnowen, is holding his stuffed frog, Gwee Gwee, which he never lets out of his sight, under any circumstances. It has been his security blanket since he was an infant. But now, he takes it out of his mouth and hands his old, tattered from to the president.

    “Well, look at this!” says the president. “Is this for me?” he asks.

    Johnowen nods shyly. “For you,” he says in a small voice.

    Sheryl and I look at each other in shock.

    “Wow, Johnowen!” exclaims Matthew.

    “Well, thank you, young man. I bet you didn’t know, but I collect frogs. Have since I was a boy like you….I’ll keep him nice and safe. You can come visit him at the Clinton Library someday.”

    How about you? Have you ever been in a situation where you realized that the generous thing to do was to take?

    I must admit I’m a little obsessed with this theme. I collect examples. It’s a paradox that fascinates me.

    Thanks to my terrific sponsor: Squarespace. Start building your website and get your free trial today.  Go to Squarespace.com, and enter the offer code “happier” to get 10% off your first purchase.

    Want to get in touch? I love hearing from listeners:

     

    Happier listening!

    The post A Little Happier: Bill Clinton and Rob Lowe’s Son Give a Lesson in Happiness. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 20:50:41 on 2016/06/21 Permalink
    Tags: , , Gertrude Stein, , , Popular Culture, , , , , ,   

    Darn It! I Missed the Longest Day of the Year. Again. 

    daisygatsby

    I love koans, paradoxes, teaching stories...and short passages from novels that seem to have a meaning just outside my understanding. I love collecting these.

    One of my favorites is from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. When  Nick meets Daisy for the first time, she tells him, “Do you always watch for the longest day of the year and then miss it? I always watch for the longest day of the year and then miss it.”

    Ever since I first read The Great Gatsby in high school, I’ve been haunted by that line. And I always watch for the longest day of the year — and I usually miss it!

    But this year, I was determined to remember and notice this day. Somehow, I got it in my head that June 21 is the longest day of the year in my part of the world. Well, today is June 21, but when I just went to go double-check, the New York Times informed me that sometimes, in these parts, June 20 is the longest day of the year.  And in 2016, it was June 20.

    So I watched for the longest day of the year, and then missed it! Yet again.

    Also, following the American folk superstition, I try to remember to say “Rabbit, rabbit” on the first day of every month, for luck. This would be easy, except that to get the luck, you have to say “Rabbit, rabbit” before you say any other words. And that’s tough.

    I like practice likes this, because they help me notice time as it passes. I’m so absent-minded; I tend to walk around in a fog unless I do things that connect me to the seasons, the passage of time, the weather, what’s actually happening around me. Like noticing the longest day of the year!1pix

    BarnabyWalkingonLeashI will say that having a dog has helped me tune in to the natural world. I take Barnaby out for his first walk at about 6:00 a.m., and I very much notice the longer days of summer. In the winter, it was full-on dark when we went for our walk, and it has grown lighter and lighter, and this morning it was bright day. Because it’s the second-longest day of the year…yup.

    Other quotations that haunt me:

    From Gertrude Stein’s The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas: “I like a view but I like to sit with my back turned to it.”

    When I was writing The Happiness Project, I was obsessed with a Spanish proverb quoted by Samuel Johnson in James Boswell’s Life of Johnson: “He who would bring home the wealth of the Indies must carry the wealth of the Indies with him.” 

    And also this line from G. K. Chesterton:  “It is easy to be heavy: hard to be light.”

    Now, maybe I’ll watch for shortest day of the year.  Which, I just learned, is December 21.

    Do you wait for the longest day of the year? Or say “Rabbit, rabbit,” or any other practice like that?

    The post Darn It! I Missed the Longest Day of the Year. Again. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 15:56:20 on 2016/06/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , Niels Bohr, , Popular Culture, , , ,   

    A Little Happier: A Lucky Charm That Works Even If You Don’t Believe In It. 

    A Little Happier with Gretchen Rubin

    Back in episode 59 of our podcast, Elizabeth and I talked about the value of giving yourself a lucky charm.

    Relying on lucky charms is superstitious, but in fact, it actually works. Researchers have found that people who believe they have luck on their side feel greater “self-efficacy”—the belief that we’re capable of doing what we set out to do—and this belief actually boosts mental and physical performance. Many elite athletes, for instance, are deeply superstitious, and in one study, people who were told that a golf ball “has turned out to be a lucky ball” did  better putting than people who weren’t told that.

    Any discussion of superstition reminds me of this perhaps-apocryphal story, about physicist Niels Bohr. I love this story!

    Most of us aren’t superstitious—but most of us are a littlestitious.

    Thanks to my terrific sponsor: Squarespace. Start building your website and get your free trial today.  Go to Squarespace.com, and enter the offer code “happier” to get 10% off your first purchase.

    Want to get in touch? I love hearing from listeners:

     

    The post A Little Happier: A Lucky Charm That Works Even If You Don’t Believe In It. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 23:51:12 on 2016/06/16 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , Popular Culture, , , ,   

    Check Out These Examples of the Four Tendencies in Movies, TV Shows, & Books. Send More Examples! 

    heigl

    Yes, I continue to be obsessed with the Four Tendencies framework I created.

    Just last night, at a dinner party, I expounded on my theory to both dinner partners, separately (one Upholder, one Questioner). Am I becoming a bore? Perhaps.

    If you don’t know what I’m talking about, you can find out here whether you’re an Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, or Rebel.

    One of my favorite things has been to gather mottoes for the Four Tendencies. So many hilarious, brilliant ones! (If you want a mug with your Tendency and its motto, you can buy one here.)

    Now I’m collecting movies, novels, and TV shows that illustrate the Four Tendencies. And I need your help. I have many examples, but I want more. Please send your suggestions — especially for Rebel. I’m surprised that I don’t have lots of fictional examples of Rebels, but so far, I don’t.

    Upholder:

    The Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling — Hermione is a textbook Upholder. She constantly (and annoyingly) reminds Harry and Ron about the regulations and laws of the magical world, she never falls behind on her homework, and she becomes very anxious when anyone breaks a law or even a school rule. Nevertheless, when she becomes convinced that official expectations are unjust, she crusades against them, even in the face of others’ indifference or outright disapproval, as she did in her campaign to improve the poor treatment of house-elves. In her final year at Hogwarts, she quits school and opposes the Ministry of Magic in order to fight the evil Voldemort.

    The Bridge on the River Kwai — The character of Lieutenant Colonel Nicholson (Alec Guiness) is a magnificent portrait of an Upholder, with all the strengths and terrible weaknesses that accompany the Tendency.

    Buffy the Vampire Slayer — A thoughtful reader wrote to me to say that she thought Buffy from the TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer was an Upholder— but shockingly, I’ve never watched that show, so I don’t have a view myself. What do you think? Is Buffy an obvious Upholder?

    Game of Thrones series — When Lord Stannis Baratheon and his men were besieged during war, they were saved when infamous smuggler Davos Seaworth brought supplies through the blockade. After the war, Stannis knighted Davos for his act—but he didn’t forgive Davos’s earlier crimes; he enforced the law by chopping off the tips of the fingers on the outlaw’s left hand. Later, when his older brother King Robert Baratheon dies, Stannis believes the crown should pass to him, as the next-oldest male in line. So he fights to assume his rightful place, and sacrifices everything he values along the way—even though he doesn’t even seem to want to be king. (I’m going by the TV show here; I haven’t read the books in a while.)

    Questioner:

    Parks and RecreationRon Swanson (Rick Offerman) is an outstanding example of a Questioner. He willingly upholds rules and expectations that he thinks makes sense—such as gun licensing laws—but ignores rules that seem unjustified—such as the building codes for his woodworking shop.

    The X-Files — I haven’t watched the series in a long time, but I think I’m correct in remembering that Mulder and Scully are both Questioners, right?

    Jane Eyre by Charlotte BronteJane Eyre is a Questioner. In fact, on the very first page of the book, Jane’s hateful aunt Mrs. Reed literally calls her “Questioner” to explain why she finds Jane annoying: “Jane, I don’t like cavillers or questioners.” (I had to look up “caviller”; it means “one who quibbles.”)

    Obliger:

    It’s a Wonderful Life George Bailey (James Stewart) is an Obliger who, at every juncture, meets outer expectations but not  inner expectations. The movie shows both the risks and the rewards of the Obliger path.  Note that when George finally drops into Obliger-rebellion, it’s aimed at himself, as so often happens with Obliger-rebellion. It makes me sad to reflect that most Obligers don’t have a Clarence to help them.

    Before Midnight — Céline (Julie Delpy) expresses Obliger frustration and is shown progressing into full Obliger-rebellion.

    27 Dresses — Obliger Jane (Katherine Heigl) satisfies everyone’s expectations, until her deceitful sister Tess pushes her too hard, and she rebels with a dramatic, destructive, ugly gesture (spoiler alert: it involves a wedding slide show). When her best friend Casey questions her actions, Jane defends herself, saying, “You’re the one who is always telling me to stand up for myself!” Casey answers, “Yeah. But that’s not what you did. What you did was unleash twenty years of repressed feelings in one night.” Yup. That’s Obliger-rebellion.

    Rebel:

    Mansfield Park by Jane Austen — Lady Bertram is a thorough Rebel; she’s also a good example of how Rebels may appear proper and conventional — until closer consideration reveals that they do only what they want to do.

    Do you have any examples to add? Do you disagree with any of my categorizations?

    It’s funny to me that I, as an Upholder, have lots of examples of Upholders, and the fewest examples of the Rebel Tendency, which is the opposite of the Upholder Tendency. I’m sure there’s a lesson in that. So suggest more examples!

    The post Check Out These Examples of the Four Tendencies in Movies, TV Shows, & Books. Send More Examples! appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:25:52 on 2016/05/31 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , Popular Culture, , , , , , ,   

    7 Reasons I Disagree with Marie Kondo’s “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up.” 

    Marie Kondo The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up

    I love the subject of clearing clutter.

    For me — and for most people — outer order contributes to inner calm. I feel this phenomenon in my own life; it exhilarates me in practice and fascinates me in theory.

    So I was eager to read Marie Kondo’s blockbuster bestseller, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. And I found it thought-provoking, and I got some great clutter-clearing tips from the “KonMari method.”

    I also have some profound disagreements with Marie Kondo.

    As I write in The Happiness Project, and Happier at Home, and Better Than Before, I’ve come to believe deeply that we all must find the way to happiness and good habits that’s right for us.

    There is no magic, one-size-fits-all solution. Just because something works for you — or Marie Kondo — doesn’t mean that it will work for me. We can all learn from each other, absolutely, but there’s no one way to achieve anything. You indulge in moderation; I abstain. You exercise in the afternoon; I exercise first thing in the morning. You like lots of abundance; I like simplicity. No one’s right, and no one’s wrong. It’s what’s true for the individual. (You can read more about this in Better Than Before, in the chapter about “Distinctions.”)

    And Marie Kondo does argue for the one best way. And here’s the thing: you read five pages of this book, and you know that Marie Kondo is an extreme, idiosyncratic personality. Which I love! Which makes the book much more interesting! But what works for Marie Kondo isn’t necessarily a great guide for what works for another person.

    From her own description of herself, she makes it clear that she’s a simplicity-lover, who likes to take big steps, who’s a sprinter, and a person who  who doesn’t feel strong emotional attachment to possessions. (Though at the same time, she shows a strong feeling of animism, which I found intriguing.) But some people are abundance lovers, and some people like to start small, and some people are marathoners, and some people have strong emotional attachments to possessions. So her guidance may not work for you.

    Here are the 7 main concepts where I disagree with Marie Kondo:

     1. She advises putting every item in a category on the floor as the first step in clearing clutter.

    She advises that that if you’re cleaning your coats, take out every single coat, if you’re clearing your bookshelves, take out every book. In my experience, this can easily become overwhelming and lead to more clutter that lasts a long time, because people bite off more than they can chew. Know yourself.

    2.  She advises having a joyful relationship with every item you own.

    She recommends asking yourself whether an item “sparks joy.” This is a terrific question, and can be very helpful. But I don’t think I can realistically expect to have a joyful relationship with every item in my apartment. I find it exhausting even to contemplate having an emotional reaction to so many common objects. It’s true, though, that for many people, “spark joy” has been a revelation. Know yourself.

    3. She advises clearing clutter alone and in quiet.

    For me, that’s very true. For many people, it’s helpful to have a clutter-clearing partner. Another person can help with the grunt work, give advice about what to keep or discard, and can make a chore more fun. Know yourself.

    4. She suggests taking everything out of your handbag, every day.

    This would not be a good use of my time or energy, and I don’t think it would achieve anything. On the other hand, when Elizabeth and I talked about “the challenge of switching bags” in episode 55 of our podcast Happier, many listeners let me know that they followed Marie Kondo’s suggestion, with great success. Know yourself.

    5. She suggests going big and doing a giant purge rather than tackling a little clutter each day.

    But, as I write about in Better Than Before, some people like to start big, and some like to start small. It’s exhilarating, and highly productive, to tackle a big, one-time goal, and a clean slate is powerful — it’s also true that we can get a lot done, by doing a little bit each day over a long term. Know yourself.

    6. She says that the best time to start is early morning.

    That’s true if you’re a morning person, but I doubt that’s true if you’re a night person. Know yourself.

    7. She suggests that folding is the best way to store most clothes.

    She’s a big proponent of folding — and a very particular method of folding. I myself just can’t handle that high level of commitment to folding.

    Know yourself. Use what works for you.

    The problem arises when you beat yourself up for not being able to do things the KonMari way, “the right way.” When it comes to clearing clutter, there is no right way, only what’s right for you.

    “When it comes to clearing clutter, there is no right way, only what’s right for you.”

    Click to tweet

    Don’t get me wrong. I love Marie Kondo’s book. I found it thought-provoking, helpful, and engaging. The minute I finished the book, for example, I got rid of a million coats.

    Here’s the thing. As I was writing Better Than Before, it seemed so obvious to me that there’s no one “right” way or “best” way to change habits. So why, then, do so many experts assert that they’d found the one true way?

    There’s something about human nature…when it comes to getting advice, we love to be given the true plan, the precise template that’s going to reveal exact directions to success.

    And when it comes to giving advice, it’s easy to assume that because some strategy works well for us, other people will use it with equal success.

    But it’s always a matter of the individual.

    I learned a lot of little things from Marie Kondo, but there was one big thing I learned: that we should stay grateful for our possessions — for having served us well, for embodying someone else’s affection for us in the form of a gift, or for giving us a thrill upon purchase. An “attitude of gratitude,” for even inanimate objects, makes us happier. I know that I’ve never let go of an old laptop without taking a moment to think, “Farewell, my old friend, we’ve had some great times together, but now it’s time for you to rest.”

    The relationship between possessions and happiness! One of the most fascinating themes I’ve ever studied.

    Did you read The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up? What KonMari Method strategies worked for you — or not?

    The post 7 Reasons I Disagree with Marie Kondo’s “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up.” appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 19:43:20 on 2016/04/26 Permalink
    Tags: , cheer, , , funny, , , , , , Popular Culture,   

    9 Terrific Movies that Always Make Me Feel Happier 

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Popcorn and Soft Drink in Empty Seat at the Movie Theater 

Empty seats 
Cinema
Movie Theatre

    If I’m in a blue mood, one of the best ways to distract myself, and give myself a quick shot of cheer, is to watch a laugh-inducing movie.

    Last week, I posted about 7 great movies about the nature of happiness and love. These are wonderful movies; they’re transcendent, but not in a laugh-out-loud way. It’s a Secret of Adulthood: Happiness doesn’t always make you feel happpy. A mystery.

    Here, though, are nine movies that always put a smile on my face:

    1. Shrek — I’ve seen this movie countless times, and it gets funnier every time. “That’s a niiiiiiice boulder.”
    2. Groundhog Day — very funny, and also very deep.
    3. The Sound of Music — I think I’ve memorized every word of the dialogue and every note of every song.
    4. Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory — funny, whimsical, just a little bit eerie, makes me nostalgic for my childhood in a nice way.
    5. Tootsie — how I love this movie. So many funny lines.
    6. Annie Hall — again, I know every line.
    7. This Is Spinal Tap — I love all Christopher Guest movies, but this is my favorite.
    8. Monsters, Inc. — so hilarious, so clever; my favorite part is the “blooper reel” at the end.
    9. Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery — I confess, I can’t remember much about the movie, but I’m including it on the list because I love the opening sequence so much. Watch it here if you need a quick pick-me-up.

    In the podcast, in episode 61, Elizabeth and I talk about familiarity vs. novelty. I love familiarity, and have re-watched these movies many times. But not everyone loves to watch (or read) things over and over, I know.

    What movies would you add? I’d love to add a bunch of suggestions to my to-watch list.

    The post 9 Terrific Movies that Always Make Me Feel Happier appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
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