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  • gretchenrubin 16:34:08 on 2017/10/12 Permalink
    Tags: , , quiz   

    Astonishing! More than One Million People Have Taken the Four Tendencies Quiz 


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    For several years now, I've been pondering, writing, and talking about the Four Tendencies -- my personality framework that divides the world into Upholders, Questioners, Obligers, and Rebels.

    I got my insights into the framework when I was working on the subject of habits; I was trying to understand patterns about when people could and couldn't successfully master their habits. This question led me to the Four Tendencies, which turned out to apply to human nature far beyond the specific context of habit-formation.

    As part of developing this framework, one of the most difficult challenges -- after the challenge of coming up with the framework itself, which practically melted my brain, it was so hard -- was the design of the Four Tendencies quiz.

    I was very fortunate to work with the brilliant people of Aperio Insights, with Mike Courtney, Nguyen Quyen, and team.  It turns out that it's a lot harder to make this kind of quiz than you might think.

    It's thrilling to see that the quiz has now passed the ONE MILLION mark. Yes, one million people have taken this quiz! I'm staggered by that number.

    You can take the quiz here. Your results will give you your Tendency, along with a simple description. If you'd like more information about your Tendency, you'll get a prompt at the end to request a detailed report.

    If you've taken the quiz, thanks for your interest, and I hope you found the results illuminating.

    If you haven't taken the quiz, but would like to take it, it's free and quick to complete. I'd love to see even more people take the quiz -- onward to two million takers. In the meantime...

    If you're thinking, "I question the validity of a framework that claims to divide the world into four categories of people," you're probably a Questioner.

    If you're thinking, "I should take this quiz, it will be a help to Gretchen," you're probably an Obliger.

    If you're thinking, "My spouse/friend/co-worker/doctor/child is telling me I should take this quiz? Well, I won't," you're probably a Rebel.

    If you're thinking, "Why would I make the effort to take this quiz, which might turn out to be a big waste of time?" you're probably a Questioner.

    If you're thinking, "This quiz is meant to help me keep my habits more easily, and to get things done more efficiently, but I don't really have much trouble with that," you're probably an Upholder.

    Okay, I'm partly joking. The Four Tendencies framework is simple to apply, but it's not quite as simple as that -- it's not possible to peg someone's Tendency from just one thought or reaction. (Though, true, it's often possible to identify a Tendency very quickly.)

    If you'd like to go deeper into the Four Tendencies, join my Better app. There, you can talk about subjects (work, health-care, parenting, romance, etc) related to the Four Tendencies; talk to other people who share your Tendency, and -- what's key for Obligers -- join or start accountability groups. There's so much interesting conversation on the Better app that sometimes it's hard for me to tear myself away. (But I can, and I do. That's the fun of being an Upholder.)

    My understanding of the Four Tendencies has been tremendously expanded by readers of my books and listeners of the "Happier" podcast-- if you have questions, insights, examples, or observations on the framework, please send them my way. I so appreciate hearing from so many people already.

     
  • gretchenrubin 17:43:43 on 2017/07/25 Permalink
    Tags: , , , quiz, , ,   

    Help! Have Ideas for a Four Tendencies Quiz for Kids? 


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    Four Tendencies Quiz Kids

    I’m getting geared up for publication of my book The Four Tendencies — planning the book tour, getting ready to launch the major pre-order bonus (stay tuned for that!), thinking about my book talk.

    I can’t wait for the book to go out into the world.

    One question keeps coming up, over and over, and I want to sit down to figure out the answer before the book hits the shelves: people keep asking me to write a version of the Four Tendencies Quiz aimed at children — so I’m going to try to draft one.

    I need to adapt the existing Quiz so that it uses vocabulary that children understand as well as examples that resonate with them. How do I help determine if a child is an Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, or Rebel?

    I could really use your suggestions and ideas! What questions should I ask? Related to dealing with school, parents, friends, coaches, classes, pets, anything that’s part of a child’s life.

    I asked this question over on my Better appmy free app that’s all about the Four Tendencies — and got such helpful, insightful responses, that I decided to ask here, too.

    One difficulty is that an eight-year-old and an eighteen-year-old inhabit very different worlds. I’m not going to write multiple versions of the child test (at least not at this point), so one challenge is to try to be general enough to cover most ages.

    For some children, their Tendency is very obvious at a very young age. For other children, it’s much harder to determine. Partly, of course, this is because children aren’t autonomous in the way that adults are. Also, their lives tend to include tremendous amounts of accountability. Nevertheless, in my experience, it’s often possible to see a child’s Tendency.

    To spark your thoughts, here are the questions from the adult version:

    1. Have you kept a New Year’s resolution where you weren’t accountable to anyone—a resolution like drinking more water or keeping a journal? 

    • Yes. I’m good at keeping New Year’s resolutions, even ones that no one knows about but me.
    • I’m good at keeping resolutions, but I make them whenever the time seems right. I wouldn’t wait for the New Year; January 1 is an arbitrary date.
    • I’ve had trouble with that kind of resolution, so I’m not inclined to make one. When I’m only helping myself, I often struggle.
    • No. I hate to bind myself in any way.

     

    2. Which statement best describes your view about your commitments to yourself?

    • I make a commitment to myself only if I’m convinced that it really makes good sense to do it
    • If someone else is holding me accountable for my commitments, I’ll meet them—but if no one knows except me, I struggle.
    • I bind myself as little as possible.
    • I take my commitments to myself as seriously as my commitments to other people

     

    3. At times, we feel frustrated by ourselves. Are you most likely to feel frustrated because…

    • My constant need for more information exhausts me.
    • As soon as I’m expected to do something, I don’t want to do it.
    • I can take time for other people, but I can’t take time for myself.
    • I can’t take a break from my usual habits, or violate the rules, even when I want to.

     

    4. When you’ve formed a healthy habit in the past, what helped you stick to it?

    • I’m good at sticking to habits, even when no one else cares.
    • Doing a lot of research and customization about why and how I might keep that habit.
    • I could stick to a good habit only when I was answerable to someone else.
    • Usually, I don’t choose to bind myself in advance.

     

    5. If people complain about your behavior, you’d be least surprised to hear them say…

    • You stick to your good habits, ones that matter only to you, even when it’s inconvenient for someone else.
    • You ask too many questions.
    • You’re good at taking the time when others ask you to do something, but you’re not good at taking time for yourself.
    • You only do what you want to do, when you want to do it.

     

    6. Which description suits you best?

    • Puts others—clients, family, neighbors, co-workers—first
    • Disciplined—sometimes, even when it doesn’t make sense
    • Refuses to be bossed by others
    • Asks necessary questions

     

    7. People get frustrated with me, because if they ask me to do something, I’m less likely to do it (even if they’re a boss or client).

    • Tend to agree
    • Neutral
    • Tend to disagree

     

    8. I do what I think makes the most sense, according to my judgment, even if that means ignoring the rules or other people’s expectations.

    • Tend to agree
    • Neutral
    • Tend to disagree

     

    9. Commitments to others should never be broken, but commitments to myself can be broken.

    • Tend to agree
    • Neutral
    • Tend to disagree

     

    10. Sometimes I won’t do something I want to do, because someone wants me to do it.

    • Tend to agree
    • Neutral
    • Tend to disagree

     

    11. I’ve sometimes described myself as a people-pleaser.

    • Tend to agree
    • Neutral
    • Tend to disagree

     

    12. I don’t mind breaking rules or violating convention–I often enjoy it.

    • Tend to agree
    • Neutral
    • Tend to disagree

     

    13. I question the validity of the Four Tendencies framework.

    • Tend to agree
    • Neutral
    • Tend to disagree

    But a new question for the kid’s version doesn’t need to inspired by this existing Quiz. It could be something completely different, as long as it shows the differences among the Four Tendencies.

    I appreciate any thoughts or examples you might have!

    The post Help! Have Ideas for a Four Tendencies Quiz for Kids? appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • gretchenrubin 13:00:17 on 2017/04/08 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , free, , , , , , , , quiz, , , , , tools, , ,   

    Big Announcement: the “Better” App Is Now Free to Use! 


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    My obsession with my Four Tendencies framework is just as strong as ever.

    Ever since I first came up with the Four Tendencies framework, I’ve grown more and more interested in it — and more and more people keep asking me questions about it. (Don’t know about the framework? Don’t know if you’re an Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, or Rebel? Take the quiz here.)

    People want information about the Four Tendencies, and they also want help — they email because they’re eager to join an accountability group, they want to work with a coach who understands the Tendencies, they want to apply the framework with their medical patients or as a manager at work or with their coaching clients. And I hear from a lot of parents who want to use the Tendencies (especially parents of Rebels).

    I’m finishing up my book The Four Tendencies (sign up here to hear when it goes on sale in fall 2017), but I also wanted a way for people to exchange ideas and questions. I’ve been staggered by people’s brilliant insights, imaginative solutions, and compelling examples. Henry James couldn’t do better.

    So I created the app Better, an app to help you harness the Four Tendencies framework to create a better life. You can use it as an app on your phone, or you can use it on your desktop.

    Since launch, there has been so much fascinating, helpful discussion on the Better app. It’s exciting to see how everyone puts the Four Tendencies into action – at home, at work, in health, and in life.

    I can hardly drag myself away from reading the comments and posts.

    When it launched, there was a $9.99 monthly charge for the app, but as publication of The Four Tendencies drew nearer, I started to think about how the app experience would be better and better (sorry, couldn’t resist that) as more people contributed.

    And I knew that for some people, a fee is a barrier.

    So I decided to make the Better app free for anyone who wants to join. The more, the better, for all of us.

    If you know people who would be interested, or who would benefit from the discussions here, or want to start or join Accountability Groups, please let them know they now can join for free.

    I hope this change makes your life a little better!

    The post Big Announcement: the “Better” App Is Now Free to Use! appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 09:30:47 on 2017/01/31 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , design, , , , , principles, quiz, , ,   

    Revealed! February Book Club: Keys to Good Design, a Personality Quiz, and High Fantasy. 


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    Because nothing boosts happiness more than a great book, each month, I suggest:

    — one outstanding book about happiness or habits

    — one outstanding work of children’s or young-adult literature–I have a crazy passion for kidlit

    — one eccentric pick–a widely admired and excellent book that I love, yes, but one that may not appeal to everyone

    Shop at IndieBound, BN.com, or Amazon (I’m an affiliate), or your favorite local bookstore. Or my favorite, visit the library!

    For all the books I choose, I love them; I’ve read most of them at least twice if not many times; and they’re widely admired.

    Bonus book this month: with Shea Olsen, my sister Elizabeth Craft has a new young-adult novel, Flower. The tag line? “She had a plan, then she met him.” Romance, temptation, secrets, college applications, celebrity...Check it out.

    Now, for the three book-club choices. Drumroll…

    A book about happiness, good habits, or human nature:

     

    The Enneagram Made Easy: Discover the 9 Types of People by Elizabeth Wagele

    On episode 99 of the Happier podcast, my sister Elizabeth and I discussed the “Try This at Home” of taking personality quizzes. The Enneagram isn’t a scientific way to understand personality, but many people find it to be an illuminating framework. To my mind, that’s the chief benefit of a personality quiz: whether it helps us glimpse into our own nature. Sometimes it’s hard to look directly in the mirror, and something like a personality quiz can help us see ourselves indirectly.

    Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

     

    An outstanding children’s book:

    The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien

    I was astonished to realize that I’ve never suggested the Tolkien books as my kidlit choice (though arguably they aren’t children’s books). These are towering classics of world literature. The Fellowship of the Ring is the first in a trilogy called “The Lord of the Rings,” and while The Hobbit isn’t part of the official trilogy, and is very different in tone, it’s quite related to the high fantasy epic that unfolds. These books are unlike anything else. Read the books even if you’ve seen the movies; as always, movies can’t capture so much that’s wonderful about books. For instance, one of my favorite characters, Tom Bombadil, doesn’t appear in the movies.

    Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

     

    An eccentric pick:

    The Pocket Universal Principles of Design: 150 Essential Tools for Architects, Artists, Designers, Developers, Engineers, Inventors, and Makers by William Lidwell.

    This is an absorbing, fascinating, accessible book. Each page has a very succinct description of a design principle, with a fascinating example on the facing page. I loved reading this book because it made me realize why certain designs in the world around me worked well — or didn’t work. It’s so fun to know about design principles like “Back-of-the-Dresser,” “Defensible Space,” “Figure-Ground,” and the “Dunning-Kruger Effect.” These may sound dry, but they’re fascinating.

    Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

     

    If you want to make sure you never miss a month’s selections, sign up here for the book club newsletter.

    Remember, if you want to see what I read each week, I post a photo of my pile of completed books on my Facebook Page every Sunday night, #GretchenRubinReads.

    I just went to the library a few days ago — my reading stack is huge. What book are you most excited to read next?

    The post Revealed! February Book Club: Keys to Good Design, a Personality Quiz, and High Fantasy. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:48:04 on 2017/01/11 Permalink
    Tags: Big Five, , , , , , , , Newcastle, , , , quiz, Quizzes, , relationship, , , , ,   

    Podcast 99: Take Personality Quizzes, Consider Your Email Habits, and Book Club Conflicts. 


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    It’s time for the next installment of  Happier with Gretchen Rubin.

    We’re having so much fun with our Instagram project. Every day, for the month of January, Elizabeth and I are posting a photo on Instagram of something that makes us happier (giving us a boost, helping us stick to good habits, reminding us to feel grateful, etc.).  Join in! Use the hashtag #Happier2017 and tag us — I’m @gretchenrubin and Elizabeth is @lizcraft.

    Try This at Home: Katie suggested taking personality quizzes to get to know yourself better. We agree!

    In episode 80, we talked about the “Five Love Languages” and why we found them so helpful. As a reminder, the Five Languages are:

    • Words of Affirmation — the love language for both Elizabeth and me
    • Quality Time
    • Receiving Gifts
    • Acts of Service
    • Physical Touch

     

    We discuss the fascinating book by Daniel Nettle, Personality: What Makes You the Way You Are. In it, you can take the Newcastle Personality Assessor that measures the “Big Five.” You can take the test here.

    • Openness to experience:  The degree of intellectual curiosity, creativity and a preference for novelty and variety a person has.
    • Conscientiousness: A tendency to be organized and dependable, show self-discipline, act dutifully, aim for achievement, and prefer planned rather than spontaneous behavior.
    • Extraversion: Energy, positive emotions, assertiveness, sociability and the tendency to seek stimulation in the company of others, and talkativeness.
    • Agreeableness: A tendency to be compassionate and cooperative rather than suspicious and antagonistic towards others; a measure of a trusting and helpful nature; whether a person is generally well-tempered or not.
    • Neuroticism: The tendency to experience unpleasant emotions easily, such as anger, anxiety, depression, and vulnerability. Neuroticism also refers to the degree of emotional stability and impulse control.

     

    The Enneagram divides people into nine categories. You can take a paid test here or a free one here.

    1. The Reformer
    2. The Helper
    3. The Achiever
    4. The Individualist
    5. The Investigator
    6. The Loyalist
    7. The Enthusiast
    8. The Challenger
    9. The Peacemaker

    If you want to take more personality quizzes, there’s a wide range on the Authentic Happiness website.

    Here, I wrote a post about ten books of personality quizzes that I’ve found interesting.

    As always, to take the Four Tendencies quiz, go here. Understanding whether you’re an Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, or Rebel is very useful. If you want to be notified when my book, The Four Tendencies comes out, sign up here. I describe my framework as my version of a Muggle Sorting Hat.

    We didn’t get a chance to talk about Myers-Briggs! Which is a very popular personality framework.

    Happiness Hack: This may be controversial: my hack is to include only one issue per email, with a clear subject line. While some people try to send fewer emails, by fitting more issues into a single email, I (for one) find this confusing and difficult to manage.

    Do you agree? Disagree?

    If you want to read about the research I mention, about the benefits of using “search” instead of sorting emails into folders: “Stop organizing your email into folders: searching your email is way faster (study).”

    Listener Question: Melanie and Rachel ask questions about book club behavior.

    Speaking of children’s literature, here’s my list of my 81 favorite works of children’s and young-adult literature.

    A lot of people read The Happiness Project in book groups of various kinds; if you’d like a discussion guide, look here.

    Demerit: Elizabeth continues to struggle with her eye ailment, blepharitis.

    Gold Star: I give a gold star to Eliza for getting me to do a better job of washing my face.

    flowercraftolsen

    Bonus Gold Star: Elizabeth’s young-adult romance Flower just hit the shelves. She and Shea Olsen have written a novel that combines love, temptation, secrets, ambition, celebrity, college applications…delicious.

    If you want easy instructions about how to rate or review the podcast, look here. Remember, it really helps us if you do rate or review the podcast — it helps other listeners discover us.

    Remember,  I’m doing weekly live videos on my Facebook Page to continue the conversation from the podcast — usually on Tuesdays at 3:00 pm ET. To join the conversation, check the schedule.

    As always, thanks to our terrific sponsors

    Check out Stamps.com. Want to avoid trips to the post office, and buy and print official U.S. postage for any letter or package, right from your own computer and printer? Visit Stamps.com to sign up for a 4-week trial, plus a $110 bonus offer — just enter the promo code HAPPIER.

    Also check out StitchFix, an online personal styling service with real stylists who handpick clothing for you — your taste, your schedule, your lifestyle, your budget. Sign up at StitchFix.com.

    Check out BlueApron.comWish you cooked more? Get all the delicious, fresh ingredients you need to make great meals, delivered to your front door. Check out BlueApron.com/happier to get your first three meals free.

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    We love hearing from listeners:

     

    To sign up for my free monthly newsletter, text me at 66866 and enter the word (surprise) “happier.“ Or click here.

    If you enjoyed the podcast, please tell your friends and give us a rating or review. Click here to tell your friends on Twitter.

    Listeners really respect the views of other listeners, so your response helps people find good material. (Not sure how to review? Instructions here; scroll to the bottom.)

    How to Subscribe

    If you’re like me (until recently) you’re intrigued by podcasts, but you don’t know how to listen or subscribe. It’s very easy, really. Really.  To listen to more than one episode, and to have it all in a handier way, on your phone or tablet, it’s better to subscribe. Really, it’s easy.

    Want to know what to expect from other episodes of the podcast, when you listen to the award-winning Happier with Gretchen Rubin?” We talk about how to build happier habits into everyday life, as we draw from cutting-edge science, ancient wisdom, lessons from pop culture—and our own experiences (and mistakes).  We’re sisters, so we don’t let each other get away with much.

    HAPPIER listening!

    The post Podcast 99: Take Personality Quizzes, Consider Your Email Habits, and Book Club Conflicts. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 16:45:33 on 2016/06/29 Permalink
    Tags: , , , fear of missing out, FOMO, , , , , , , quiz, , ,   

    Podcast 71: Choose a Signature Color, and Ask “Am I an Alchemist or a Leopard?” Plus FOMO. 


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    Photo by Emily Orpin

    It’s time for the next installment of  “Happier with Gretchen Rubin.

    Update: We’ve heard from people about how they’re designing their summer. Great ideas.

    Try This at Home: Choose a signature color. This is a big commitment! I’m not sure I can make the jump, but I’m intrigued. What’s your color? How did you choose it?

    I mention the Time article, “How Your iPhone Photos Make You Happier. ” And I also mention Alice Walker’s novel, The Color Purple: “I think it pisses God off if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere and don’t notice it.”

    Below is the photo from my friend with her collection of things in her signature color.
    1pixSignature Color

     Know Yourself Better: Are you an alchemist or a leopard? My first Personal Commandment is to “Be Gretchen.”

    Listener Question: Bethany asks about FOMO — “fear of missing out.”

    If you want to take the Four Tendencies quiz, it’s here.

    Elizabeth’s Demerit: Elizabeth screamed at Adam when he didn’t like any of the fabric choices for their new banquette.

    Gretchen’s Gold Star: I give myself a gold star for managing to stay calm and enjoy Eliza’s prom experience. If you want to listen to Eliza’s view of her junior prom, you can listen to her podcast, Eliza Starting at 16.

    Remember,  I’m doing weekly live videos on my Facebook Page about the podcast. To join the conversation, tune in Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. Eastern.

    As always, thanks to our terrific sponsors

    Check out Headspace. Experience the benefits of meditation in your busy life. Download the Headspace app for free, and begin their Take 10 program for ten days of guided meditation. Go to Headspace.com/happier.

    Also check out Stitch Fix — clothing and accessories hand-selected by a personal stylist, especially for you, and delivered right to your door.  Sign up at Stitchfix.com.

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    We love hearing from listeners:

     

    To sign up for my free monthly newsletter, text me at 66866 and enter the word (surprise) “happier.“ Or click here.

    If you enjoyed the podcast, please tell your friends and give us a rating or review. Click here to tell your friends on Twitter.

    Listeners really respect the views of other listeners, so your response helps people find good material. (Not sure how to review? Instructions here; scroll to the bottom.)

    How to Subscribe

    If you’re like me (until recently) you’re intrigued by podcasts, but you don’t know how to listen or subscribe. It’s very easy, really. Really.  To listen to more than one episode, and to have it all in a handier way, on your phone or tablet, it’s better to subscribe. Really, it’s easy.

    Want to know what to expect from other episodes of the podcast, when you listen toHappier with Gretchen Rubin?” We talk about how to build happier habits into everyday life, as we draw from cutting-edge science, ancient wisdom, lessons from pop culture—and our own experiences (and mistakes).  We’re sisters, so we don’t let each other get away with much.

    HAPPIER listening!

    Featured image by Emily Orpin.

    The post Podcast 71: Choose a Signature Color, and Ask “Am I an Alchemist or a Leopard?” Plus FOMO. appeared first on Gretchen Rubin.

     
  • feedwordpress 19:02:46 on 2016/02/20 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , framework, , , , quiz, , , , , , ,   

    Do You Love Personality Quizzes? These 10 Books Will Help You Understand Yourself. 


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    Books to help you know yourself

    They say there are two kinds of people in the world: people who want to divide the world into two kinds of people, and the kind of people who don’t.

    Well, I’m the kind who does. I love personality frameworks. I believe they can be a great tool for self-knowledge — they help shine a spotlight on patterns of behavior and thinking.

    That said, it’s important not to let categories become stifling; they’re not meant to box us in or limit our sense of possibility, but to point the way to helpful understanding or change.

    Of course, my favorite personality framework is the one I created, which divides people into Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, and Rebel. Learn more and take the Quiz here.

    Since Better Than Before hit the shelves, I’ve been thrilled to hear from readers and podcast listeners how much the Four Tendencies has helped them.

    If you love a good personality framework as much as I do, you may be interested in reading other systems:

    1. The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to Your Mate by Gary Chapman.

    Argues that people speak different “love languages”: Words of Affirmation, Quality Time, Receiving Gifts, Acts of Service, and Physical Touch. I love this book. I’m “Words of Affirmation,” by the way. I still can’t figure out what my husband is! He is a man of mystery.

    2. Beyond Time-Out: From Chaos to Calm by Beth Grossman and Janet Burton.

    Argues that in families with an imbalance of family power, parents fall into four categories: Pleasers, Pushovers, Forcers, and Outliers.

    3. The Wisdom of the Enneagram by Don Richard Riso and Ross Hudson.

    Divides people into nine categories: Reformer, Helper, Achiever, Individualist, Investigator, Loyalist, Enthusiast, Challenger, and Peacemaker. I’ve heard that Hollywood writers use the Enneagram to help them create rich, believable characters.

    4. Why Him, Why Her? How to Find and Keep Lasting Love by Helen Fisher.

    Argues that people fall into four relationship types: Explorer, Building, Director, and Negotiator.

    5. Gifts Differing: Understanding Personality Type by Isabella Briggs Meyers.

    Based on the theories of Carl Jung, argues that people fall into sixteen types, in different combinations of four pairs: Extroversion or Introversion; Sensing or Intuition; Thinking or Feeling; Judgment or Perception. This super-popular framework is controversial, but many people swear by it.

    6. Please Understand Me by David Keirsey.

    Divides people into four temperament groups, with four sub-types per groups: Artisan (Promoter, Crafter, Performer, Composer), Guardian (Supervisor, Inspector, Provider, Protector), Rational (Fieldmarshal, Mastermind, Inventor, Architect), and Idealist (Teacher, Counselor, Champion, Healer).

    7. Now, Discover Your Strengths by Marcus Buckingham.

    Discusses the thirty-four “strengths” and helps readers identify and take advantage of their own strengths.

    8. Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath.

    Discusses the thirty-four “strengths” and helps readers identify and take advantage their individual own strengths.

    9. Better Than Before by Gretchen Rubin.

    Of course, I have to add my own book to the list! Find out if you’re an Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, or Rebel, and how you can put that knowledge to use as you work on your habits. Or, even more fun, how you can help other people work on their habits. The Four Tendencies are useful to understand in the context of habits — but also, in many other contexts as well. Right now, in fact, I’m working on a book that explores the Four Tendencies at length. If you want to be notified when it’s available, sign up here.

    People often ask me how the Four Tendencies framework correspond to other frameworks — for instance, how it matches up with Myers-Briggs. In my view, all these frameworks have their own nuances, which are lost if we try to map one framework onto another. So I don’t try to do that.

    10.The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin.

    Many people have also told me that my book, The Happiness Project was also a meaningful tool for self-knowledge as they embarked on their own Happiness Project. Especially the “Be Gretchen” idea from my personal commandments.

    Has one of these frameworks been very helpful to you? What frameworks have I overlooked?

     
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